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Posts tagged ‘Shirtless’

“Trip of Love” Dreamy, Sweet, Shimmering, Sexy Ode to the ’60s

Trip of Love 1For a dreamy, trippy, zippy, sexy time travel musical back to the ’60s, don’t miss “Trip of Love” at Stage 42. There’s no book. It’s a musical revue, a form that we don’t see very often anymore. Juke-box musicals rule the day on Broadway these days. I mean “Beautiful” is still running, and the original Tony-winning”A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” has just closed. But “Trip of Love” totally surprised me with how delightfully entertaining it was. Without any plot or dialogue, it’s just very well put together entertainment by multi-talented director. choreographer, and SET-DESIGNER James Walski. And the sets are as eye-popping as the dancing is non-stop exhilarating.

I haven’t seen this much dancing in a Broadway show, (well, it’s Off Broadway actually, but who’s quibbling. It’s on W.42nd Street in a largish Off Broadway house.) since Bob Fosse left this planet.  And a dancing show it is.”Trip of Love” is exuberantly entertaining. And the dancers fantastic.

And the men, dare I say it, are sexier in this show, than any I’ve ever seen. It’s true that most of the men are constantly losing their shirts in almost every number, but I found that refreshing, and even innovative.Trip of Love 2I was at a disadvantage in that the performance I saw the three female leads were out, but their understudies were all fine, so no wonder the men dominated the show, with or without their shirts.

Austin Miller had pants slung so low that they were in constant danger of slipping off. As did his co-stars Brendon Leffler and Joey Calveri. Backed by an incredible ensemble, who shone, and shimmied and burned down the house with their on-fire choreography by Walksi.

“Wipe-Out” was a particularly incendiary number (pictured at top), which of course, had no lyrics whatsoever, and in this case, with the dancers placed atop pillars of waves, they didn’t need them. It was that great surfing number with heavy guitar riffs.

Trip of Love 3Then Walksi would blow your mind with the ballads, particularly the beautiful “Moon River” with a giant silvery moon backing a shimmering blue river and a young dancer named Colby Q. Lindeman doing a pas-de-deux with a young ballerina from the ensemble, as Tara Palsha  (I think…so many swings were on, I’m not sure who the actress/dancer was. Lisa Finegold?) Anyway, Palsha was on a swing, singing a plaintive “Moon River” in a style that Harry Mancini could’ve arranged himself. And would’ve loved. The set was so blue that the lyrics “Huckleberry Friend” finally made sense.

And this swoon-worthy number, that literally gave me goose-bumps, ended Act I in tremendous fashion. And took me back to the days when I, as youngster, was dreaming in the Bronx, of “Crossing you in style, someday. Dream maker, you heart-breaker, where ever you’re going, I’m going your way…”

And wearing out the red vynyl 45 RPM of “Moon River,” I played it so much. The Original, with the Henry Mancini chorus and orchestra. I loved that song before Andy Williams ruined it, for my money.

But director/creator/choreographer James Walski has brought it back to its “Breakfast at Tiffany” roots. And designed that blue Moon set that I will never forget. I can’t wait to see what his next extravaganza will be!Moon River 1

And that was just Act I! And Act 2, topped it in energy, enthusiasm and sexy brightness. I can’t wait to back to see it a second, and maybe even a third time!

Colby Q 1

And I have to say, Colby Q. Lindeman danced throughout the show, not just in the spectacularly moving “Moon River” number, and yes, he danced his way into my heart.

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Wondrous, Joyful, Surprising “On the Town” on Bway

On the Town 1Imagine my surprise! To be thoroughly delighted, enraptured even, by a musical I always had a “meh” attitude towards previously. I had seen “On the Town” over and over in its’ many iterations and on film, too, and it had never turned my buttons. But THIS revival of “On the Town” pressed all of them, surprisingly and with joyous delight. Quelle Surprise! And why is this “On the Town” different from all the others?

The main answer I have to deduce is to give all the credit to its’ talented Tony  nominated director John Rando. He, of “Urinetown”, has really gone over the moon and captured it with his buoyant, light-as-air, but just-right re-interpretation. Rando and choreographer Joshua Bergasse have put the sauce (as in saucy) and the sex(see above picture^) back into “On the Town” making it as fresh and redolent as a Spring daisy.

I do think that that is what has been missing from all the other “On the Towns” I’ve ever had to sit through and go “What’s the fuss?” Well, the fuss started in 1944, right smack dab in the middle of WWII, when its’ three one-day-only shore-leave sailors burst off their battleship in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and onto the streets and subways of New York singing “New York, New York! It’s a helluva town! The Bronx is Up and the Battery’s down! The people ride in a hole in the ground!”

And in 1944, there also burst on to the Broadway scene, one of the most talented quartets the Great White Way was ever going to see, composer Leonard Bernstein, choreographer Jerome Robbins, and lyricist/librettists Betty Comden and Adolph Green. And what an explosion of talent that must’ve seemed to war-weary New Yorkers, who were seeing their city celebrated in the most joyful way imaginable.

And Comden and Green were IN it, too! As the loopy anthropologist  Claire de Loone(oy) and her mug of a tar.Ozzie, here essayed marvelously by Drama Desk Nominee Elizabeth Stanley and Clyde Alves. Stanley gets to show her considerable comic vocal chops in Act I’s “Carried Away” and her dramatic vocal ease in Act II’s “Some Other Time.” This is the part Betty Comden played originally. While her counterpart cohort, goofball Ozzie, was originally Adolph Green himself.

What a show that must’ve been! In 1944. But this “On the Town” seems to be just a good if not better. And did I mention they have an UNCOVERED 28 piece orchestra? One of the biggest I’ve ever heard on Broadway and they played Berntein’s classical score magnificently, dreamily. I never wanted them to stop!

Hunky Tony Yazbeck, nominated for the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical, works himself (and the audience) into a sweat with “New York, New York”,”Gabey’s Coming”, “I’m So Lucky To Be Me” as well as dancing all the  pas de deux ballet breaks (and there are many), then breaking your heart with “Lonely Town.” A star is truly born here. Gene Kelly played the part in the movie and Yazbeck obliterates his memory

His(Gaby)’s story drives the plot as he searches for his subway poster dream girl “Miss Turnstiles.” He finds his mythical  Ivy Smith, here embodied by real life Ballerina turned Broadway star Megan Fairchild  in a singing class led by the redoubtable (and hilarious).Jackie Hoffman, who is a comic drunk for the ages.

Completing the trio of star tars is the thumpingly innocent farm boy Chip, (Jay Armstrong Johnson) who with his 10-year-old, out-of-date New York visitors guide falls into the clutches of lady cab driver from Mars Hildy Esterhazy. And the hefty Hildy (Alysha Umphress) literally kid-naps (or in this case cab-naps) the virginal Chip into one of the most hysterical New York taxi-rides ever seen, aided and abetted by Beowulf Boritt’s masterful back-projections. Chip doesn’t stand a chance.as Hildy exults “Come Up to My Place” adding “I Can Cook Too” to great comic effect.

So, as a Native New Yorker myself, I was blown away and elated by this rainbow-of-a-valentine to My Fair City. SEE IT! New York, New York Is a Helluva Town!

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