a.k.a. "The Oscar Messenger"

Posts tagged ‘PBS’

Oscar Last Minute ~ “Spotlight” & Mark Rylance Rises

Oscar MarchOscar Nominees 2016 Supp.ActressLast minute Oscar thoughts. I can’t believe(!) but OTOH, I do, that Oscarologist Maestro Tom O’Neill just changed his prediction for Best Picture from “The Revenant” to “Spotlight!” Not only that also over at Gold Derby, my esteemed colleague Jack Matthews, seems to be having the same thoughts I was expressing in my last post about British Actor Mark Rylance upsetting Sylvester Stallone in Best Supporting Actor. Rylance is nominated for “Bridge of Spies” and Stallone for his Rocky 6 comeback “Creed.” Is everyone at Gold Derby just reading this blog and stealing my ideas, or are they really the REAL THING? Le Vrai Choise, as the French would say? You can check Gold Derby out here. http://www.goldderby.com

Or are we all witnessing and reporting the same thing? I.E. “Spotlight” could win, and personally I hope it does. And so could Rylance. Pictured below with his real life counterpart, who he played so subtly and brilliantly in “Bridge of Spies.”Over at the Wrap, Steve Pond has been suggesting that the Best Way to Win an Oscar Pool is “to follow the Best Picture.” Meaning that nominees in other categories usually tend to be in or from the Best Pictures. And lest we forget “Bridge of Spies” is also a Best Picture nominee, directed by Steven Spielberg.Mark Rylance 4And also Jack Matthews, in a really great article, the same one I referenced above at Gold Derby, is talking about Deadlines.  And I must confess, full disclosure, that I entered a for real Oscar pool this year, and picked the popular choices “The Revenant” for Best Picture and Sylvester Stallone for Supp. Actor, despite the qualms I’m writing about here.

After reading Tom and Jack, I feel I’m going to lose that pool. I would have won a free ticket to an AMC cinema movie. Oh! Just what I need! To see ANOTHER movie!

Well, being a film critic, it just never ends. They keep coming. And as we speak on a beach in Santa Monica, California, under their signature tent, the Independent Spirit Awards are being handed out. Check out http://www.awardsdaily.com who have a thread announcing the winners as they happen.

And what’s going on at the Indpendent Spirit Awards? I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see “Beasts of No Nation”s Abraham Attah, the child soldier win Best Actor there. And also who’s going to deny Idris Elba yet ANOTHER Supporting Actor trophy for the same film?

Idris Elba 4I also think “Tangerine” might surprise. You know that little tranny movie shot on an iPhone? It has a LOT of nominations.

And one more word about Mark Rylance. If there’s a living successor to Sir Laurence Olivier, he’s it. He’s a great actor. One of the greatest now living and is obviously going to go on to an equally stellar career on the big and small screen.

He was terrific in PBS’ “Wolf Hall” this year. In this day and age, there is beginning to be no big difference between TV and movies. Especially as far as acting achievements are concerned. His Oliver Cromwell was ANOTHER great performance. He was in nearly every scene of the entire successful mini-series of the dirty doings during Henry VIII’s reign and he held your attention every single minute. And Academy voters have that to consider,too, as they look at the Supporting Actor category.Mark Rylance Wolf Hall 1Plus, he’s an awards magnet. Every time he steps on a New York stage, they throw a TONY at him.Mark Rylance & Tony

Maybe they’ll start doing that with Oscars now, too.

 

Funniest Documentary Ever Made! Monday, May 20 at 9pm on PBS! Of course, it’s “Mel Brooks: Make a Noise!”

Dear Readers, dear cineastes, dear lovers of theatre, you’re a in for a real, rich treat! You’ll never be able to stop laughing! I swear! “Mel Brooks: Make a Noise!” is coming your way on Monday, May 20. Stop the presses! Save the date! Circle it in red on your calendar! It’s something that I’ve never seen before on American Masters. It’s non-stop funny! It captures Brooks quite completely at his laugh-out-loud best. It’s hysterical. How many documentaries do you see that tickle your funny-bone? Almost none. So hooray for “Make A Noise”!

The new documentary on the comedy legend premieres nationally
Monday, May 20 at 9pm (ET/PT) on PBS (check local listings)
On DVD From Shout! Factory May 21, 2013

Oy! It’s soooo funny! I’ve already watched it TWICE! I can’t stop! Documentarian Robert Trachtenberg firmly restores Mel Brooks to the position from which his last Broadway flop, the musical of “Young Frankenstein” toppled him a few years back. He’s the American King of Comedy, a giant in the industry, a comic legend, and all those other great descriptions which really almost do not do him justice.

Except for the omission of “Mel Brooks: Young Frankenstein:The Musical” which would’ve been its ending, “Mel Brooks:Make a Noise” is well-nigh perfect. But it would have been too sad to end this joyous, mirthful man’s life story there.

It’s instructive that when Brooks’ career hits his mid-life low point, Trachtenberg even makes his flops look and sound funny.

And there’s a lot of news here, too. Like for instance, that the young Melvin Kaminsky started out as a drummer, among other things.

That his first taste of show business was his Joe uncle, a cab driver, took him to see his first Broadway show at nine. “Hey, Mel. I’ve got two tickets to a brand new Broadway show.” the original “Anything Goes” with Ethel Merman. And they even have a brief black and white clip of Merman onstage singing “Blow, Gabriel Blow” in 1934!

Brooks’ comment “It was thrilling! Thrilling! We were sitting in the last row of the second balcony. There were no mikes. Ethel Merman was still too loud and she was two miles away!”

And so this brilliant doc rolls on and on like a comic juggernaut, that REFUSES to stop making you life out loud at every turn.

We find out that his father died when he was two and that he was raised in “real poverty” in Willlamsburg, Brooklyn, with his three brothers. And a mother whom he adored.

We find that he was in World War II. That he had a first marriage, and three children.

That his marriage to Oscar-winning actress Anne Bancroft was one of the most enduring, true love stories in Hollywood history.

That he has trouble sleeping, stays up to three most nights and reads the classic.

Joan Rivers”You’re shocked to find out that this man is an intellectual.”

And on and on and on in a career that has so many highs its’ riduculous. “The Producers”(on film and on Broadway), “Blazing Saddles”, “Young Frankenstein”(The movie, not the musical) and everything else in between.

I have a Mel Brooks anecdote myself. I was sitting in the Broadway restaurant Angus McIndoe’s when “Young Frankenstein: The Musical” was about to close. Several years ago, and I said to my friend, “There’s Mel Brooks!” And he seemed totally absorbed in something. And he seemed very sad.

I couldn’t figure out what he was doing, he was so intent in his concentration, and that I realized that he was walking around to each picture on the walls and I saw that he was saying a silent “good-bye” to each one. Like he was saying “Good-bye” to Broadway. Like he felt he would never be back there again. And for the record, he hasn’t been. At least not yet. One thing “Mel Brooks: Make A Noise” makes clear is that you can never guess what Mel Brooks is going to do next. Can a musical version of “Blazing Saddles” be far behind?

SO in its own BIG way, American Masters “Make a Noise” is bringing about yet another great Mel Brooks come-back. He’s doing a huge promotional tour in support of this stupendous doc.

He can still make us laugh. We want him to. We need him to, that’s for sure.

“Downton Abbey” Ends and Begins to Shoot Season 4

Well, that was a BANG-up finale to perhaps the strongest season yet, Season 3, of “Downton Abbey,” a few weeks back now. It’s taken me this long to come to terms with its’ being over soooo quickly, and also so tragically…

SPOILER ALERT! SPOILER ALERT!SPOILER ALERT!

I knew Dan Stevens, who played the handsome, perfect Matthew Crawley, was leaving at the end of this season. There had been MUCHO publicity about it. How could this be? No Matthew! Oh Nooooo! You can’t DO that, Author Julian Fellowes! Noooo! How will we, nevermind Lady Mary, his pregnant wife, do without him?????

But Stevens’ three year contract was up, and I personally feel he’ll rue the day. I don’t think his fans will ever forgive him for leaving. And he’ll never live up to the career high of “Downton” and the classic, unforgettable heart-throb he created in Matthew Crawley.

So, we knew his character’s end was nigh. But it was the really harsh and violent CHOICE of how they choose to write him out, erase him completely, that was startling. Yes, Matthew Crawley is dead. Really dead. Dead as a Dickensian door-nail.

And the sight of the intense close-up of his handsome corpse with the blood running in a rivulet down his beautiful, dead blonde face was really something that stuck in my mind. I wish I could get it OUT of my mind! It’s haunting! That’s the word!That someone so young and so dashing and so rich, someone who had survived the trenches of WWI, only to die, like James Dean, too soon, too soon…WELL!

And as I watch that episode over and over and over again.
(What ELSE is there to watch on TV that’s THAT good? I mean, really!)

Well, that shot and the scenes of marital bliss leading up to it with his address to his newborn baby son, “My dear little chap.” Well, it began to get to me more and more the more I re-watched it. And of course, the tragedy of Lady Mary, the ever more and more magnificent Michelle Dockery’s fate, as a newly widowed single mother, is even more magnified the more that I see it. The happiest of images of her in that sun-filled room and her little baby grabbing at her finger…*sob*

But not to worry, dear fellow, Downtonians. They are already shooting Season 4. And we know Shirley MacLaine will be back for a least one more go ’round with the legend herself Dame Maggie Smith…The way the show keeps moving forward in time, the Dowager Countess must be now circling 100!

Another departure I saw coming in Ep.7 was the exit of Downton’s own Wicked Witch of the West, O’Brien. Author Fellowes had pretty much written himself and O’Brien’s character, into a corner with the utter blackness of O’Brian’s hideous, irredeemable soul, so she had to go.

And at the end that episode, we see her cozying up to Lady Susan, who is not at all happy with HER Lady’s maid, and is about to be posted to Bombay with her husband Cousin Shrimpy. Et voila! There goes O’Brien off to deepest, darkest India.

And I imagine Siobhan Finneran, the excellent Irish actress who has had the difficult job of making us love to hate O’Brien, for three seasons now, may have just had enough of this unrelenting, no-where-to-go-but-down character.

That brief scene in the happy, new love nest of the ideal working class couple Anna and Bates, where Bates whispers the words “Her Ladyship’s Soap” into O’Brian’s shocked ear. Well! It sends a chill down O’Brian’s spine that I felt, too, and sends her packing from the Bates’ house without her even having had her tea!

“Get Back in the Knife Box, Miss Sharp!” Indeed.

What will Season 4 bring? Well, STAYED TUNED! I know I will be!

Downton Abbey Season 3 ~ Ep.6 ~ There Are Fairies at the Bottom of the Abbey

SPOILER! SPOILERS! AND MORE SPOILERS! ALERT!

CODE VIOLET!

Or rather, as she’s called by some of her family, Cousin Violet (Dame Maggie Smith) was in full purple sail in Ep.6, the penultimate episode of “Downton Abbey” Season 3. Yes, dear readers, dear Downtonians, Season 3 is ending next week. *sob*sigh*sharp intake of breath* Alas!

Quality television is sooo rare these days and “Downton Abbey”s got it. In Spades.

And in the dreamy episode 6, Cousin Violet prompts Cousin Isobel to say “Have you changed your pills?” In one delicious set-to after the other, over Uber-social reformer Cousin Isobel’s (the superb Penelope Wilton) wanting to maintain former prostitute and former Downton maid, Ethel, as her cook and house-keeper.Shocking!

MEANWHILE!

Rob James-Collier’s sinister bad boy and head valet Thomas comes out of the shadows and is really at the center of this magnificent episode, which is, yes, an exploration of the attitudes towards homosexuality in the unenlightened Roaring 20s. In Post War Downton, everyone downstairs seemed to be roaring at Thomas. So bad Thomas, become poor gay Thomas and overwhelming sympathetic.

Thomas’ redemption began in Ep. 5 as he broke down crying at the death of Lady Sybil in childbirth in Ep.4. Rob James-Collier’s breakdown was as involving and empathetic and it was surprising in its’ power. “She didn’t even know I was alive!” he sobs “She was the only one who was nice to me!”

The death of Lady Sybil is going to be an ever-occuring and equivalent touchstone to the”Upstairs Downstairs” death of Lady Marjorie on the Titanic. Everything from now on will keep referring back to the untimely death of the lovely Lady Sybil at 24 years of age.

One keeps coming back to the fact of “Why? Why did they kill her off in such unceremonious, but incredibly compelling dramatic fashion?” And I keep coming up with the answer Well, she couldn’t act very well, so what else were they going to do with her?

With her abrupt passing, Tom Branson, the stupendous Alan Leech has really come into his own as the grieving father, former chauffeur and left-behind Irish son-in-law, who, in this episode begins to take over the running of the estate. He’s the new manager. And as magnificently played by Leech, he’s also becoming a very major character and dare I
say it? A heart-throb.

Which brings me back to the other emerging male star of Season 3, Rob James-Collier’s Thomas, who in this wonderful and also horrifying episode is called upon to play depths of emotion, his character has never been called upon to play so far. There are layers upon layers of dreadful humiliation as his frustrated gay feelings have nowhere to goand get him in to terrible trouble this episode.

Led on by the devilish Miss O’Brien, a former friend, Thomas thinks that Jimmy(Ep Speleers), the flirty footman is infatuated with him.

And so one night, he attempts a very beautiful kiss of the sleeping footman, the gorgeous Jimmy, who awakens and threatens to punch Thomas’s headlights out.

This disturbance is witnessed by the witless Alfred Nugent, and is reported upon by both Alfred and Jimmy to the Head Butler the super proper, Mr. Carson, who is revolted. And calls Thomas in to tell him he’s “foul” among other choice insults as he prepares to fire him. Thomas movingly says as he’s leaving”I may not be like you. But I’m not foul.”

And the major plot now revolves in this gripping episode of what are they going to do with Poor Gay one-handed Thomas?

James-Collier really proves himself to be a considerable actor as he is called upon by the brilliant, subtle script to play all the levels of loneliness, hurt, heart-break and degradation that homosexuals of that time, and earlier, were subjected to.

Oscar Wilde’s name was mentioned and that scandal that landed Wilde in jail in the Gay ’90s, was a mere two decades earlier than Downton’s time of 1920. And Thomas is constantly threatened with jail for his innocent, aborted kiss. As Wilde was. He was found guilty and sentenced to two years imprisonment at hard labor because he was gay. It ruined his health and destroyed his talent.

And of course, who is behind all these machinations? Thomas’ former partner-in-crime Miss O’Brien, the wicked witch of Downton, who, I’m happy to say, does get her comeuppance quite grandly at the end of these two hours of television glory.

Oh! And Bates gets out of jail! I almost forgot! And it is in Bates’ and Anna’s new home, a cozy little cottage on the estate, bien sur, that we watch them happily refurbish as poor, gay, lonely Thomas sinks deeper and deeper into depression and hopelessness that the wicked trap, ,which evil Miss O’Brien has set for him snaps shut.

There is a saving punch-line to all this, but neither Bates nor Anna knows what it means, and why it causes Miss O’Brien so suddenly to heel, bitch.

And the words that brought her down off her broom=stick and back to earth with a resounding thud?

“Her Ladyship’s bar of soap”.

Anyone who has been watching since Season One will know what that means, but it’s too complicated and dastardly to explain here.

As I have to also comment on Lady Edith’s emerging career as a newspaper columnist! Laura Carmichael also outdoes herself in this episode and she begins, through writing to find herself. I could identify.

It also takes this busy, jam-packed episode to London, where she is chaperoned by her Aunt Rosamond, Lady Painswyck. And so we get to see more of that delightful character. who is the Dowager(Maggie Smith)’s smart London daughtet, and watch with unalloyed joy as Lady Edith, the mouse of the glamorous Grantham family, begins to assert and find herself through journalism! A column! She becomes a blogger, Roaring ’20’s style, and of course, her editor falls in love with her.

Laura Carmichael is magnificent as she goes from the recently jilted bride, left at the altar in Ep.2, and we delight in her triumph as she becomes the butterfly that was still in the cocoon at Downton and begins to spread her wings ~ a bit. Though she is still very shy and proper. And she can’t believe people are responding to her writing! I know how that feels!

ANOTHER wonderful Downton episode, two hours of heaven, then next week, two more hours and it will be gone until next season. And yes, there is going to be a season 4 and maybe much, much more according to a Vanity Fair article on Julian Fellowes, whose brilliant and sole creation this is. He does all the writing of all the episodes of all the seasons himself! It’s all him! It amazes me!

Because that almost never is allowed to happen in American television, which is why British television is so superior to ours almost always. Because the British have this thing about “The Writer” and it’s called respect. And it’s a beautiful thing.

“Downton Abbey” which is becoming the most successful series ever on PBS, can be seen on Sundays at 9pm on Ch.13 in New York and is rebroadcast on Monday at 1am. Or rather Tuesday morning at 1am. It can also be seen on Ch.21 WLIW on Mondays at 8pm.Don’t miss it!

“Beasts of the Southern Wild” One of the Best Movies of the Year!

Everything Oscar Goddess, Cannes diarist and predictress extraordinaire Sasha Stone said about “Beasts of the Southern Wild” is true. And it deserves all the acclaim that has been heaped upon it, and there will be more to come. MUCH more.It’s one of the best, most original films of the year. Best Screenplay Nomination. Adapted. It’s based on a book.

And I’ll write more about it later. And that little   girl! OMG! A magnificent, wholly original achievement! And the director is only 23 years old! ^faints*

In other news, just saw Academy Award winner the fabulous Estelle Parsons pre-theater-ing it at the Edison Cafe. She called me “dear”. *faints again*

And THEN as I was leaving the building, I ran right into Lydia Bastianich of the Food Channel and PBS’s Italian Cooking with Lydia (or Lydia’s Kitchen) and said “I love your show! I watch it all the time!” And I do. She said, “Thank you” rather stunned that she was being recognized.

There are stars everywhere in New York! I’m so lucky to live here!

Masterpiece “Downton Abbey” Swirls Its’ Way to a Magnificent Conclusion!

I am sooooo addicted to Masterpiece Theatre’s well, masterpiece, “Downton Abbey”! I was wondering when I was going to have the time and space to write about it, but now, with only one more episode left, the Second Season Finale, there’s no time left to start throwing superlatives at it! But don’t worry, at least its last show will ALSO be two hours long, like tonight’s was.

With all the Oscar excitement happening every other minute, I have barely had a chance to catch my blogger’s breath to spend the time and give the respect  to “Downton Abbey” that it deserves for being the magnificent achievement in series television that it is. It’s overwhelming. As all great art should be.

I have NEVER been so swept up by a British TV series in decades! Decades! Of course, it reminds one of “Upstairs, Downstairs” which I love as well. It’s all about the VERY rich Crawley(what a dreadful name) family, and their three marriage-aged daughters, Lady Mary, Lady Edith, and Lady Sybil AND their servants.

The difference between “Upstairs, Downstairs” was that it was set very firmly at 25 Eaton Place, a town house, in the grandest of styles, in London itself. It was about life in a CITY house, with servants. And lots of stairs.

“Downton Abbey” is set in an overwhelmingly majestic mansion that is nearly a castle in Yorkshire. DEFINITELY the country. And there’s a lot of stairs there, too, but with grand stair-cases.

And presiding over all of Downton’s magnificence, is the brilliant Dame Maggie Smith, always a personal favorite of mine, since, well, since forever.

I had the great good fortune to have seen her onstage in her youth(and mine) do Margery Pinchwife in “The Country Wife” ( with the divine and busty Patricia Routledge as Lady Fidget, who yes, was hilarious, and yes, couldn’t stop fidgeting!) And she was equally at home as Ibsen’s “Hedda Gabler” which she did under the direction of the late great Ingmar Bergman, which I saw her do in the West End.

Maggie was overpowering and as excellent in serious roles, though  she is today  mainly known for her great comedy. And certainly her Dowager Countess of Grantham, the grandest of grande dames, is the grandmother of the Crawley brood. She seems simply hilarious, but as World War I broke out in the Second Season, Dame Maggie began to be able to show that her Dowager Countess had real metal as well as smarts AND heart. It’s a magnificent, career-capping performance that matches the majesty of Highcleere Castle,(yes, it really IS a castle) that is standing in as the fictional Downton Abbey.

Everyone in the series matches Dame Maggie. They HAVE to! All the many characters REALLY engage you and keep you watching no matter what. Particular favorites of mine are the two eldest Crawley daughters, Lady Mary (Michelle Dockery) and Lady Edith (Laura Carmichael).

Michelle Dockery, who is new to me (as are much of the cast except of course, Dame Maggie and American actress Maureen McGovern, as the mother of Crawley girls and Lady Grantham’s daughter-in-law) is SUCH a discovery as a new British leading lady. She has much of the weight of the series love story to carry and she does it with tremendous power, as she high-lights all of the many facets of Lady Mary’s VERY complicated character. You love her. You hate her. You want her to be happy, then you don’t want that at all. Then you love her again.

The same can be said of the less-seen Lady Edith, who is just as conflicted. Laura Carmichael looks a little like Maggie Smith when she was young, and you can see her being the grand-daughter who takes after her granny. Although as the plain, middle-sister sandwiched between two beauties Lady Mary and Lady Sybil, she has a very hard time of it. Especially in Series One, where her constant sparring and betrayal of Lady Mary, formed much of the drama pre-war in “Downton Abbey,” which they all just refer to as Downton. As if it were a person in their lives.

And one of the great glories of this superb series is Downton really is a tangible presence in all its’ characters’ lives. They can’t live with it, and they can’t live without it. And they are all living in a world that very shortly will be gone with the wind. Literally. As World War I changes everything.

In Series Two, I was not ready for my beloved British servants/masters series to turn into a war-time drama, but dear readers, dear cineastes, the War only lasts for part of Series Two. Enough to take away one of the most memorable characters, but I decided not to spoil any of this once-in-a-lifetime viewing pleasure, so I won’t put any spoilers here.

But suffice it to say, I will have A LOT MORE to say about this wonderful, unbelievable triumph of great writing, Julian Fellowes, who was the author of “Gosford Park” and great acting and directing. Down to the smallest part all the roles are perfectly cast, and “Downton Abbey” ends its Second Series on next Sunday on PBS. It’s another two-hour episode, and it never flags. It never gets tired. And it’s always enthralling.

So my greatest rave would be two words SEE IT! Next Sunday! At 9pm! The Sunday BEFORE the Oscars!

But more good news is that they are going to have a Series Three which starts in 1920! And Shirley MacLaine is joining the cast as Lady Cora(Maureen McGovern’s mother) and the Crawley girls’ American grandmother. That should be a hoot and a half!

My favoritie line of THIS evening’s episode ~ Maggie Smith to her grand-daughter Laura Carmichael as Lady Edith “Edith, don’t be depressive! It’s soo middle class!”

Masterful Woody Allen doc on PBS! Part 2 tomorrow!

Dear Readers, Dear Cineastes, you MUST see the new Woody Allen doc on American Masters on PBS! It’s simply one of the best things I’ve ever seen on TV! And if you think you know Woody, think again! There is sooo much new material on Allen, who is really letting us see inside his life, in a way, he’s never done before…It was gripping, compelling, revelatory!

And Part Two is on tomorrow night! At 9pm! Monday night! So don’t miss it! It’s required viewing! I loved it!

I just sat there enthralled. I who have seen “Midnight in Paris” EIGHT TIMES! I was just overwhelmed how much this man, this one human being, had such an impact on my life. And of course, also, my work. It really is staggering.

Well, we’re both redheads, and we’re both native New Yorkers. He’s from Brooklyn. I’m from the Bronx.

He’s Jewish. I was raised Catholic.

And he emphasized things, in this, I guess, the official, authorized version of his life story, that I had assumed, but never thought he would admit. Like for instance, the impact Diane Keaton had on this life and work…Well, he starred her in SOOOOO many movies and he won her the Oscar for “Annie Hall” which remains to this day his only Academy Award winning movie…and also the same for Keaton.

She was certainly his great muse and the relationship endured for years, and he acknowledges her talent, and the impact she had on his life.  And I was staggered to be reminded just how many movies he starred her in. It was almost uncountable.

And the way he laid out, or the filmmakers did, just how his career grew and developed and CHANGED and evolved and I realized that I had seen every single one of his Part One movies. I was a die-hard fan in those days! I guess I still am.

Part Two is going to be very interesting, because I think it’s entitled “Woody and Mia” and it’s going to be very compelling to see how they handle his Second Act, which is plagued with The Scandal. And that hovers overz him, like a black cloud, to this day.

This was a very palpable (there’s that word again) plea for remembrance and re-consideration of his staggering oeuvre, coming right when it does at Oscar time, and when his great financial success “Midnight in Paris” is on everyone’s Oscar list.  Will he win Best Picture? Well, I think for sure he’s going to win Best Original Screenplay. And there will be more nominations in categories people aren’t expecting him and his film to turn up in. He may get a Best Director nomination. And Corey Stoll and Marion Cotillard may both turn up in the Supporting  categories and there may be many technical below-the-line, as they say, categories, where “Midnight in Paris” could score, too.

This really stupendous American Masters profile is one of the best,most vital things PBS has ever done. And it kept going back and back everytime to his writing. Emphasizing that it was his writing that everything flowed from.

So, yes, to a Best Original Screenplay win and I can’t wait to see Part Two tomorrow night!

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