a.k.a. "The Oscar Messenger"

Posts tagged ‘Film Critic’

Jeff Wells Admits Eddie Redmayne Could Beat Michael Keaton

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Well, it had to happen. Jeff Wells of Hollywood-Elsewhere, arguably the biggest supporter of “Birdman” now admits that yes, as I said all along since I saw it in Toronto, that Eddie Redmayne could very well topple Michael Keaton’s front-runner status for the Best Actor Oscar!

I couldn’t believe I was reading this because Jeffrey has been such a staunch admirer of Keaton, but all along I’ve been on Team Eddie!

What he has to do in “The Theory of Everything” as the severely crippled British genius Stephen Hawking in terms of the great Oscar determinator “Degree of Difficult” is off the charts amazing.

Disabilities, when they are as well and as feelingly portrayed as they are in “Theory of Everything,” are catnip to Academy voters and especially the dominant Actor’s Branch. But this will appeal across all branches.This film has Triumph of the Human Spirit written all over it.

It’s exhilarating. Inspirational to the max. When I think there’s something I can’t do these days, I just think of what that OTHER Stephen has had to go through all this life, and well, it just encourages me to struggle on.

And Jeff Wells writes about this feelingly in his latest posting, quoting David Denby’s elegiac, rapturous review of Redmayne’s performance in this week New Yorker.

Check out what Jeff had to say here at http://www.hollywood-elsewhere.com

I never thought he’d admit it in print, but realist that Jeff is, he did.

I think the recently reconstituted Focus Features is doing this just right for Redmayne and “Theory,” just as I hoped they would.

There was a lovely piece on Redmayne and Felicity Jones, who plays his devoted wife, Jane,and who may also be in line for an Oscar Nomination of her own, in the New York Times, at just the right moment that it should be this past week.

This film is also an amazing love story on top of everything else. Based on Jane’s memoir, it is the story of both their battles, and her dedication to her husband in spite of EVERYTHING. Or because of EVERYTHING is just awe-inspiring. As is this film.

It’s hands down the Best Film of the Year, and I am so glad I saw it at the Toronto Film Festival in September.

If you put Stephen Hawking on the one hand and try to balance it on the other hand with a portrait of a self-absorbed asshole of an actor (Birdman) well, guess which way the awards’ scales tip?

“Lincoln” Sneaks in NJ, Viewer Tweets NY Post “It’s Boring”!!

NY Post’s film critic Lou Lumenick received an outraged twitter review & email from a film goer who saw the sneak preview of “Lincoln” in NJ yesterday and complained that the film was “boring.” As Lumenick parsed it “take it with a grain of salt.” But the way he presents it in his article www.nypost.com ,it DOES sound as dry as dust.
It evidently keeps most of its’ action in the Congressional rooms and hallways, eschewing the more dramatic CIVIL WAR ITSELF that was raging outside. Nevermind the horrors of slavery. It’s all about LEGISLATION. I knew it. I just knew it. Screenwriter Tony Kushner is  very academic, almost pedantic sometimes. And it looks like  this time is one of THOSE times. AND it’s nearly three hours!

Given this info, plus the rather strange and deadly trailer of “Lincoln” that popped up last week, I think Dreamworks may have a real historic Oscar dud on its’ hands. If Hollywood hands Oscar a lemon, Oscar doesn’t make lemonade. He just nominates SOMEBODY ELSE.

This enraged viewer wrote to Lumenick that “It WILL NOT be nominated for Best Picture”! But thought Daniel Day-Lewis would. Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln was “miscast”. I believe that, too. And this news also makes sense of Fox Searchlight’s rushing “Hitchcock” into release on Thanksgiving weekend. Making it eligible for this year’s Oscars, not next and putting Sir Anthony Hopkins’ Sir Alfred Hitchcock right in the, er, thick of things.

Best Actor seems so crowded this year. With DDL, Joaquin Phoenix(“The Master”), Hugh Jackman{“Les Miserables”) and John Hawkes in Searchlight’s other contender “The Sessions” all but locked down. Means that “Life of Pi” and “Flight” coming up fast at the New York Film Festival and which I’m doomed, er, destined  to see very soon, might not be All That.

And then there’s the volatile, still-open-for-business Best Actress category, which Dame Helen as Lady Alma Hitchcock, who is evidently at the center of the story of this movie, and yes, it’s a mature love story, could slip right in there. Knocking out another slippery Dame. Judi. For Fox Searchlight’s “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” and/or Fox 2.0 ‘s OTHER Best Actress filly in the race, 8-year-old Qu’venzhane Wallis.  For “Beasts of the -Southern Wild.” I personally don’t think Fox Searchlight is acting SURE about either of their ladies-in-question.

Nevertheless,  Searchlight saw a place and decided to fill it with the formidable weight-y, Oscar-baity  Sir Alfred.

Hollywood loves Hollywood more and more each day.

See last year’s, Best Picture “The Artist” which won four other Oscars, too, including Best Actor for Jean Dujardin and “Hugo” also about early filmmaking, though in France. “Hugo” got four technical Oscars, but they are Oscars nonetheless.

Shot VERY quickly by documentarian Sasha Gervase, whose only other previous helming was the hilarious doc “Anvil:The Story of Anvil” and it seems he got every thing right!

Doc makers know how to make that first take work. That’s all you’ve got in documentaries. You have no choice. You have to GET THAT SHOT, or else, it’s gone forever. It’s called Run and Gun and I like working that way myself on my TV show http://www.youtube.com/StephenHoltShow.

And “Anvil” was that rarest of docs. One with a sense of humor!

So, back to “Lincoln”, even though I’m sure the feelings of the film-goer that contacted Lumenick were genuine, Stephen Spielberg’s films, even the weakest, like “Munich”, or misguided like “War Horse”, they STILL get a Best Picture nomination regardless, but in a field of ten possibles, I’m still sure “Lincoln” is IN.

But look at Sir Alfred go! His corpse is dancing! Maybe all the way to the Oscars! And in his lifetime, let it be noted Hitch never won a Best Director Oscar himself. Maybe he’ll be getting one posthumously.

He was one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. THEE greatest in MY book.

Pioneering Film Critic Judith Crist, 90, Passes, Always a Gracious, Gracious Lady

Judith Crist, who without my realizing it until perhaps today, the day of her passing at age 90, had more of an influence on my life than I ever imagined.

I only met her once, when I interviewed her, back when I was in college, for the school newspaper. I don’t have a copy of it, I don’t think. I had interviewed Estelle Parsons, famously, the night before she won the Oscar for “Bonnie and Clyde.” BUT THATS ANOTHER STORY! Suffice it to say, it was a success and made the headlines of the University of Rhode Island’s “Beacon.”

I know how I got backstage to interview Estelle. I just asked. At the stage door. And they let me in!

But how I ever got to Judith Crist, I absolutely don’t know. I knew, I, a budding celebrity journalist, even then, I had to do something to top the Estelle Parsons interview. It made the headline of my paper, and I don’t know how I made the jump from her to Judith Crist, but it seemed logical at the time.

Judith Crist was at the height of her fame then. I had grown up avidly reading her every word every day in the New York Herald Tribune, which is the long-gone and much-missed newspaper that my parents bought every day. She was their film critic, and she was also on TV too on the Today Show. Where she did stick out like a sore thumb amongst the ditto-heads and the polished types. Polished, she wasn’t.

But she spoke her mind clearly, succinctly, and you remembered what she said. She loved foreign films, I remember that. I think I asked her about that when I finally did get to meet my (unacknowledged) idol. I wish I could remember more of exactly what she said, but alas I don’t. And not being a really trained journalist I don’t think I even took notes.

But I remember her very, very well. I couldn’t believe I was really in her house. The one she lived in all her life on Riverside Drive overlooking the Hudson river. It was one of those very old, grand apartments that went on it seemed forever, rooms upon rooms. High ceilings, too. Not like the shoeboxes of today. And it was very dimly lit, I remember. Just some lamps here or there. And there was no doorman. I think her name “Crist” was on a list outside the door, and you just pushed a button, and she let you in. Or maybe you just went right in. Very heavy, ornate iron door, I remember. Typical New York wrought iron decoration over glass. The door was as open as she turned out to be. You just went right in.

She was dressed in earth tones, too. Nothing showy. Like the apartment. She wasn’t ever trying to impress with her sense of style or her looks, god knows. On TV she looked like anomaly, because she looked like A REAL PERSON.

And every morning, before I went off to school, I had grown up watching her review movies on the Today show. My mother always said, “I like what she says. I think she’s right.” Didn’t matter that my mother hadn’t seen the movie. You just trusted Judith Crist’s taste.

And she didn’t much like Hollywood movies. Yes, they were still churning out the same amount of dreck that they do today, believe it or not. Read her Obit in the NYTimes. You can she how she never minced words. I guess I was a little afraid she was going to be that way with me. But she wasn’t at all. She was surprisingly friendly.

And I asked Mrs. Crist about her seeming championing of small, foreign films all the time, films not even in English, with god help us, SUB-TITLES. Why did she like foreign films more than American movies?

“Well, they’re just better! ” she snapped. I don’t remember her really snapping at me, like she seemed to be doing all the time on TV, except in that brief moment of fire.

She was incredibly nice to me, as was Estelle Parsons. I think Judith Crist might even have been in the phone book. And I just called her up and asked for an interview for my school paper, and unbelievably, she said “Yes” Immediately.

She liked the brashness I must’ve exhibited, I guess. Cold-calling her like that. She identified with it. I was a critic, too, for my school newspaper and was minoring in Journalism, and I think she felt a kindred spirit. And of course, we both loved movies.

I told her I wasn’t majoring in journalism. I was majoring in Acting. “I want to be an actor, a writer and a director, ” I declared. I can’t believe I told her that.

And she said, “You’re a real Renaissance man. You’re like Robert Shaw. I just interviewed him. He does everything, too.”

And she totally accepted that I was going to do and be all the things I said I was going to do. She didn’t belittle or demean my aspirations. She accepted them. She respected me. I remember being shocked actually by that. And well, she was right! I did go on to do all that. And I think she knew I would. She was the first person in her position in the industry to accept me as what I was and what I wanted to be. She was encouraging.

I guess she felt anyone who began their career interviewing  a future Academy Award winner the night before she won the Oscar had something on the ball. I was the Oscar Messenger even then. I told Estelle Parsons she was going to win. Then the next night, she did!

I’ll always have a very warm spot in my heart for Judith Crist. She was a gracious and accepting lady. No pretense about her whatsoever. She was real. She was who she was. And she knew what she knew. No nonsense.

I never saw her again, but always followed her reviews and her career with interest. When she was dropped from the Today show, my mother said “She was too good for them.” And she was right.

And I couldn’t believe that as a fledgling cub reporter, my second great interview was with TV star  Judith Crist! And she had been incredibly kind and supportive to me. I think she saw my burning ambition to be an actor was going to over-ride my instincts as a journalist. But she saw I had them.

I remember opening with her, your opening line with a celebrity is everything, I instinctively knew that, by telling her my father had put himself through Columbia School of Engineering during the Depression, at night. And she was very impressed by that.

And I knew she’d gone to Columbia, too. Maybe she thought I’d wake up from my Acting Reverie and go to Columbia School of Journalism. She probably would’ve helped me. But the thought never entered my mind. Until now.

I remember asking her about being famous and she said, “I guess the Today Show put me on the map. If the Map is what I’m on.” And she left it at that.

Judith Crist, you re-wrote the Map!

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