a.k.a. "The Oscar Messenger"

Posts tagged ‘Best Actress in a Musical’

Will Drama Desk Winners Repeat at the TONYs?

Jessica & Cynthia 1Will Drama Desk Winners repeat their triumphs at the TONYS? Probably. This year, especially. I think so. Above are pictured the two Best Actress winners. Jessica Lange for “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” and British newcomer Cynthia Erivo who is starring in “The Color People.” Lange won for Best Actress in a play and Erivo won for Best Actress in a Musical. I think these two ladies are Won and Done. At the Tonys.

Also poised to repeat at the TONYs are their two male counterparts in Drama Desk triumph Danny Burstein in “Fiddler on the Roof” and Frank Langella in the French play about an Alzheimer’s victim “The Father.”

I think all four of these powerhouse thespians can rest assured the Tony Voters will like them, really like them,too. The Tony Voters  do look increasingly to the Drama Desk winners to narrow their playing field, as it were.

This year, though, the theatrical phenom “Hamilton” is nominated for more TONYs than any other production in Broadway history. But in these four leading categories I don’t think it will register as it is likely to do in others. “Hamilton” won nearly every award in the book LAST year when it was eligible for the Drama Desks(and also the Outer Critics Circle and the Obies) because it played Off Broadway first at its’ historic run at the Public that launched it to Broadway.

And although two of its’ leading men author/actor Lin Manuel Miranda and Leslie Odon are both nominated for Best Actor in a Musical, I think they will cancel each other out, leaving the way for the popular veteran Danny Burstein to triumph for his joyous Tevye in “Fiddler.”

In other news, I think juggernaut “Hamilton” may find itself stopped at the TONYS. Although it was nominated for a historic 16 awards, I think it’s going to register much, much less than that.

The only acting award I think is a surefire win for “Hamilton” is the charming young African-American actress Renee Elise Goldsberry, who won the Drama Desk last year for Best Featured(or Supporting) Actress in a Musical.Renee Rlise Goldsberry 1

And on the Drama side, the powerful performance of veteran Jayne Howdeyshell from the Best Play Drama Desk winner “The Humans” could score in Supporting, which is where the TONYS put her and co-star Reed Birney, although they are both leads. “The Humans” also won for Best Ensemble at the Drama Desks, a special category that the DDs always give, but the TONYs do not.Jayne Houdyshell Humans 1

“Hamilton” will win Best Musical for sure. But the TONY voters are notorious for spreading the wealth around, and I think they will do that this year, too, in spite of “Hamilton” perceived dominance.

#Drama Desk Awards, # Hamilton, # Tonys, #Jessica Lange, #Cynthia Arivo, #A Long Day’s Journey Into Night, #Color Purple, #Best Actress in a Leading Role, #Danny Burstein, #Frank Langella, #Fiddler on the Roof, #The Father, #Lyn-Manuel Miranda, #Renee Elise Goldsberry,#Jayne HowdyShell #The Humans

“Into the Woods” is 4D. Drab, Disappointing, Depressing & Disneyfied

Woods PrincesInto the Woods 1Yes, that’s right “Into the Woods” is in 4D. Not 3D. The D’s being Drab, Disappointing,  Depressing, and yes, Disneyfied. What a great waste of a Great What-Might-Have-Been. A golden opportunity squandered and cheapened like the Golden Egg that the Giant’s Golden Goose lays (off-screen in Giantland) and that Jack (of Beanstalk fame) steals. It looks more like a giant basketball, than an egg. But it serves as a metaphor to represent what the makers of this mess have turned a great musical into. A Golden Basketball. Or something that the whole family can use and bounce around, hurting or offending no one.

Except perhaps those of us who saw the ORIGINAL Broadway production in the ’80s. I can barely describe the power it had in that first incarnation.

The niftiness( and shiftiness) of combining all those great Grimm fairy-tales of childhood lore into one complicated Jungian mash-up.

And then, and THEN, because all these presumptuous fairy tale characters, Jack main among them, have caused the death of the giant, his wife, a giantess, descends to stalk the land and squishes half of the cast to death.

Believe it or not, this was a musical that I always felt was Stephen Sondheim’s reflection of the AIDS crisis, which was at its’ fever peak, at the time of the original Broadway production. Suddenly, for almost no reason, half the characters we had come to like, some of them a lot, like the Baker’s Wife, just DIED.

And this was a metaphor for the AIDS crisis. Half or more of all the people I knew, mostly gay, although some not, phfft, were gone never to return.

So in that sense the original ’80s “Woods” was heart-breaking, soul-searing and profound and when Cinderella, beautiful beyond description, sang “No One Is Alone” to the survivors of the Giantess’ wrathful apocalypse, it was utterly moving and I remember it to this day, a jewel-like, ineffable Broadway musical moment. It was cathartic.

I was waiting to feel SOMEthing like that in this facockta movie version. But no. I didn’t get it. Although they had the super, sharp Anna Kendrick sing it. Not a traditional beauty with her hawk-like, aquiline features, she radiates intelligence, which is all to the good and she sings beautifully, but THEY KEPT CUTTING AWAY FROM HER!?! Which in this case ruined the impact of the iconic song and the film’s climatic moment utterly diluted and lost.

This is just one small example I can pull from MANY in this film, trying to illustrate just how watered-down, and MILD. Nearly pure pablum this disappointing Disneyfication is.

What a shame!

The death of one of the central characters was absolutely pivotal to the original and her death by gigantic squashing was traumatic in the original because she was the one really decent character (spoiler alert!) the Baker’s Wife, who you really cared about. The role was considered a lead and won Johanna Gleeson a Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical, no mean feat, in any year.

Here played by Emily Blunt, the part seems curtailed, and well, blunt-er. And certainly her death is. She sort of falls out of frame, slowly, like she was simply, well, falling. A little girl in the row where I sat said “Mommy, what’s happened to her?” In fact, the child kept voicing simply confusions all the way through the movie.

Emily Blunt’s part has been curtailed in its’ impact to feature more of her co-star Meryl Streep as the Wicked Witch. And thank goodness they have Meryl in this movie! SHE’S terrific in it. She sings and screams and cackles up a storm, and casts spells with the help of perfectly executed special effects. Her performance seems larger than life and it is! It should be. And she’ll get her 19th Oscar nomination and then lose to Patricia Arquette for “Boyhood.”

But as good as she is when she’s all made up in horror garb and face-to-give-you-nightmares, when she transforms into the beauty she once was about half-way through the film (and of course, loses all her magical powers), she plays it as a blue-and-green version of Kim Kardashian, which makes her not at all the heroine she turns into in the stage version. She’s a reality show joke. So the film loses its’ moral compass there, too.

British comedian James Corden is mis-used too as the Baker. He seems ten years too young to be Blunt’s hubby, and he just over does or over-bakes all that he has to do. He’s too much of a muchness. Whereas Blunt in what should be the leading role, is just not enough.

There are high-points, though. Main among, the surprisingly comic duet of the two Princes, Cinderella’s Prince, and Rupunzel’s Prince, wailing about “Agony” on the rocky outcroppings of a stream. Chris Pine, as the really sleazy Prince Charming, shows you just why Cinderella keeps running away from him, couldn’t be better in this scene. And Broadway’s Billy Magnusson matches him beat for bare-bresting bro beat, as they keep trying to out do, or out-complain or out-splash each other, as each claims to have the greater “Agony”, and they both end up soaking wet! Hilarious. Billy for those who don’t know was Spike in Christopher Durang’s Tony-Winning play “Vanya, Sonia, Masha and Spike.”

And then the film settles down to its’ gobbledygook of a book. And the tedium layer in this lonnnng film gets higher and higher.

Broken thankfully, by Meryl, chewing as much scenery as she can fit in her green mouth, as she knocks both “The Last Midnight” and “Children Will Listen”(the other great Sondheim song) out of the ball-park, hitting high-notes you never thought were in her register. Such a shame that she never got to do “Evita” when she was the right age for it. And MADONNA got to do the screen version! What a sad story that turned out to be!

And yes, a lot of the Sondheim score is present and accounted for, but a lot also seems to be missing, replaced by even inane-er dialogue by James Lapine, who simply should be shot at dawn for participating in the tragic abortion of a film musical.

And they think THIS is going to appeal to a family audience?!?! It’s going to give little children nightmares. Like Lilla Crawford’s performance as Little Red Riding Hood will surely do for the rest of my life. For all the wrong reasons.

Johnny Depp is great in a VERY small part of the Big Bad Wolf. In this case, I WANTED him to devour Lilla Crawford completely. But no such luck, she is saved, and alas we have to endure looking at her and listening to her sing(flat) for the rest of this overlong, un-fulfilling movie.

So the dueling, vain Princes, and Meryl’s Witch-for-the-Ages, make the unbearable bearable.On my Top Ten List, it’s not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oscar Apple Cart Upset by Late-Breaking “Into The Woods?

Into the Woods 1Stephen Sondheim and movies of his work have never really clicked with the public. See Elizabeth Taylor in “A Little Night Music”, and of course, more recently “Sweeney Todd” with Johnny Depp. But Musicals are catnip to the Academy.

Depp is back again as the Big Bad Wolf whose  nemesis is Little Red Riding Hood, a very lethal Little Red Riding Hood. But the word from the screenings yesterday is that Meryl Streep is once again going to be back at the Dolby Pavillion for something like her 20th nomination. But which category will she be in? Could she win? She’s got three Oscars already.

The always excellent Emily Blunt has the Baker’s Wife role in the film and that’s the part that has historically won awards. Joanna Gleeson on Broadway won a Tony for Best Actress.  And pert, pretty Anna Kendrick is getting good  W.O.M.(word of mouth) as Cinderella. A former Oscar nominee for Best Supporting Actress for “Up In The Air” could she also be up again of her sparkling Cinderella?

And where does that put Meryl’s Wicked Witch? The Academy put her in lead last year for “August:Osage County” when many thought she’d be Supporting and Julia Roberts would be lead, but the categories were reversed.

That could happen to Emily Blunt, too. And she and Anna Kendrick could be up against the here-to-fore unstoppable Patricia Arquette in “Boyhood.” Would they knock her out of the leading contender spot? In Supporting.

Meryl’s Witch certainly could. The plot sickens.

 

Image

Gentleman’s Guide Sweeps Drama Desk Awards with 7!!!

Gentlemen's 1Gentlemen's Guide 2Gentleman's Guide Sweeps Drama Desk Awards with 7!!!

It was quite a big night for wit and brilliance on Broadway as the super-smart “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” swept the Drama Desk Awards tonight with seven wins at a gala awards presentation at Town Hall. The glamourous packed audience roared its’ approval.

It won Best Musical, Best Actor in a Musical Jefferson Mays, Best Featured Actress in a Musical, Lauren Worsham, Best Director of a Musical Darko Tresnjak, Best Book of a Musical Robert L. Freedman, Best Lyrics Steven Lutvak and Robert L. Freedman, Best Projection Design in a Musical Aaron Rhyne.

I only wish it could’ve been a three way tie, and the stupendous Bryce Pinkham, who was also nominated for Best Actor in a Musical, could’ve won, too. And Lisa O’Hare should’ve been nominated, too, for her super-slinky Sibella.And may I say, Steven Lutvak should’ve won for his glittering score. And so should the set and costumes, too! I’m such a fan! I hope it sweeps the Tonys, also! I think it will.

The unusual,odd occurance of a double tie, something that has never happened before in my memory as a Voting Member of the Drama Desk, happened tonight as Best Actor in a Musical, the most hotly contended of all the categories, except perhaps Best Musical, got BOTH Neil Patrick Harris of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” AND Jefferson Mays, as I said, Best Actor in a Musical Awards.

And in Best Featured Actress in a Musical, Lauren Gorsham, as the colortura soprana ingenue Phoebe in “A Gentleman’s Guide…” tied with Anika Larsen, of “Beautiful” who plays Carole King’s wise-cracking best friend and rival composer. Interestingly both actresses were profiled together in a New York Times article that combined the two lovely young performers and strangely predicted the tie in their category.

Audra McDonald won Best Actress in a Play for “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grille” for her searing, elegiac performance of the late Billie Holliday in the last days of her life. Many thought she was in the wrong category since she sings over a dozen of Holiday’s greatest hits in the show that is presented as if it were in a supper club as the audience is grouped in small cocktail tables on what is usually the floor of the orchestra of the Circle in the Square theater.

But it mattered not what category she was in to the Drama Deskers, who voted her Best Actress in a Play anyway! Didn’t think they would, but they did! Damn the semantics! Full speed ahead to the Tonys! Where she might become the very first performer to ever win SIX!?! If she wins there, too. If she won this big award, from the persnickety Drama Desk voters, (she already won the Outer Critics Circle), she’ll win the Tony, too, I think. DONE!

How many Drama Desk Awards has she won? More than Tonys even, I bet!

Best Actress in a Musical was Jessie Mueller as Carole King in “Beautiful,” a juke box musical consisting of Carole King’s many many hit songs.

Best Actor in a play went to Bryan Cranston in “All the Way” which also won Best Play.

All these performers in the major categories, Audra McDonald, Brian Cranston and Jessie Mueller could very well repeat at the Tonys NEXT Sunday night June 8. But who will win Best Actor in a Musical? Will both Jefferson Mays and Neil Patrick Harris tie again? This is something that has never happened at the Tonys. Stay tuned!!!

A complete list of the winners, as well as the nominees, is below. The winner are highlighted in bold.

http://www.DramaDeskAwards.com
DRAMA DESK AWARD NOMINEES FOR THE 2013-2014 SEASON
(WINNERS IN BOLD)

Outstanding Play
Nell Benjamin, The Explorers Club
Steven Levenson, Core Values
Conor McPherson, The Night Alive
Richard Nelson, Regular Singing
Bruce Norris, Domesticated
Robert Schenkkan, All the Way
John Patrick Shanley, Outside Mullingar

Outstanding Musical
A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Aladdin
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Fun Home
Love’s Labour’s Lost
Rocky
The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Revival of a Play
I Remember Mama
London Wall
No Man’s Land
Of Mice and Men
The Cripple of Inishmaan
The Model Apartment
Twelfth Night*

*Shakespeare’s Globe Production

Outstanding Revival of a Musical
Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Les Misérables
Violet

Outstanding Actor in a Play
Bryan Cranston, All the Way
Hamish Linklater, The Comedy of Errors
Ian McKellen, No Man’s Land
David Morse, The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin
Chris O’Dowd, Of Mice and Men
Daniel Radcliffe, The Cripple of Inishmaan
Denzel Washington, A Raisin in the Sun

Outstanding Actress in a Play
Barbara Andres, I Remember Mama
Tyne Daly, Mothers and Sons
Audra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill
Laurie Metcalf, Domesticated
J. Smith-Cameron, Juno and the Paycock
Harriet Walter, Julius Caesar

Outstanding Actor in a Musical
Neil Patrick Harris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch TIE!
Adam Jacobs, Aladdin
Andy Karl, Rocky
Jefferson Mays, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder TIE!
Steven Pasquale, The Bridges of Madison County
Bryce Pinkham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Outstanding Actress in a Musical
Sutton Foster, Violet
Idina Menzel, If/Then
Jessie Mueller, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Kelli O’Hara, The Bridges of Madison County
Margo Seibert, Tamar of the River
Barrett Wilbert Weed, Heathers: The Musical

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play
Reed Birney, Casa Valentina
Chuck Cooper, Choir Boy
Peter Maloney, Outside Mullingar
Bobby Moreno, Year of the Rooster
Bill Pullman, The Jacksonian
Brian J. Smith, The Glass Menagerie

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play
Betty Buckley, The Old Friends
Julia Coffey, London Wall
Diane Davis, The Model Apartment
Celia Keenan-Bolger, The Glass Menagerie
Jan Maxwell, The Castle
Sophie Okonedo, A Raisin in the Sun

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical
Danny Burstein, Cabaret
Nick Cordero, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Joshua Henry, Violet
James Monroe Iglehart, Aladdin
Rory O’Malley, Nobody Loves You
Bobby Steggert, Big Fish

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical
Stephanie J. Block, Little Miss Sunshine
Anika Larsen, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical (tie)
Adriane Lenox, After Midnight
Sydney Lucas, Fun Home
Laura Osnes, The Threepenny Opera
Jennifer Simard, Disaster!
Lauren Worsham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder (tie)

Outstanding Director of a Play
Joe Calarco, A Christmas Carol
Tim Carroll, Twelfth Night
Thomas Kail, Family Furniture
Bill Rauch, All the Way
Anna D. Shapiro, Domesticated
Julie Taymor, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Outstanding Director of a Musical
Sam Gold, Fun Home
Michael Mayer, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Bartlett Sher, The Bridges of Madison County
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Alex Timbers, Rocky
Darko Tresnjak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Outstanding Choreography
Warren Carlyle, After Midnight
Steven Hoggett, Kelly Devine, Rocky
Danny Mefford, Love’s Labour’s Lost
Casey Nicholaw, Aladdin
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Sonya Tayeh, Kung Fu

Outstanding Music
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Andrew Lippa, Big Fish
Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Alan Menken, Aladdin
Kevin Murphy and Laurence O’Keefe, Heathers: The Musical
Jeanine Tesori, Fun Home

Outstanding Lyrics
Howard Ashman, Tim Rice, and Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Michael Friedman, Love’s Labour’s Lost
Michael Korie, Far from Heaven
Lisa Kron, Fun Home

Outstanding Book of a Musical
Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Robert L. Freedman, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Joe Kinosian and Kellen Blair, Murder for Two
Lisa Kron, Fun Home
Douglas McGrath, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Marsha Norman, The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Orchestrations
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
John Clancy, Fun Home
Larry Hochman, Big Fish
Steve Sidwell, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Michael Starobin, If/Then
Jonathan Tunick, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Outstanding Music in a Play
Lewis Flinn, The Tribute Artist
Elliot Goldenthal, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Rob Kearns, The Life and Sort of Death of Eric Argyle
Tom Kochan, Almost, Maine
Nico Muhly, The Glass Menagerie
Duncan Sheik, A Man’s a Man

Outstanding Revue
After Midnight
I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Musik from the Weimar and Beyond
Le Jazz Hot: How the French Saved Jazz
Til Divorce Do Us Part
What’s It All About? Bacharach Reimagined

Outstanding Set Design
Christopher Barreca, Rocky
Alexander Dodge, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Richard Hoover, Small Engine Repair
Santo Loquasto, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Ian MacNeil, A Doll’s House
Donyale Werle, The Explorers Club

Outstanding Costume Design
Constance Hoffman, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
William Ivey Long, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Zane Pihlstrom, Nutcracker Rouge
Loren Shaw, The Mysteries
Jenny Tiramani, Twelfth Night
David C. Woolard, The Heir Apparent

Outstanding Lighting Design
Christopher Akerlind, Rocky
Jane Cox, Machinal
David Lander, The Civil War
Peter Mumford, King Lear
Brian Tovar, Tamar of the River
Japhy Weideman, Macbeth

Outstanding Projection Design
Robert Massicotte and Alexis Laurence, Cirkopolis
Sven Ortel, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Aaron Rhyne, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Shawn Sagady, All the Way
Austin Switser, Sontag: Reborn
Ben Rubin, Arguendo

Outstanding Sound Design in a Musical
Kai Harada, Fun Home
Peter Hylenski, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Peter Hylenski, Rocky
Brian Ronan, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Dan Moses Schreier, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Jon Weston, The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Sound Design in a Play
M.L. Dogg, The Open House
Katie Down, The Golden Dragon
Paul James Prendergast, All the Way
Dan Moses Schreier, Act One
Christopher Shutt, Love and Information
Matt Tierney, Machinal

Outstanding Solo Performance
David Barlow, This is My Office
Jim Brochu, Character Man
Hannah Cabell, Grounded
Debra Jo Rupp, Becoming Dr. Ruth
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, August Wilson’s How I Learned What I Learned
John Douglas Thompson, Satchmo at the Waldorf

Unique Theatrical Experience
Charlatan
Cirkopolis
Mother Africa
Nothing to Hide
Nutcracker Rouge
The Complete & Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill Vol.

Special Awards Each year, the Drama Desk votes special awards to recognize excellence and significant contributions to the theater. For 2013-2014, these awards are:

To Soho Rep.: For nearly four decades of artistic distinction, innovative production, and provocative play selection.

To Veanne Cox: For her ability to express the eccentricities, strengths, and vulnerabilities of a range of characters, and notably for her comedic flair as evidenced in this season’s The Old Friends and The Most Deserving.

To Ed Sylvanus Iskandar, the Sam Norkin Off-Broadway Award: For his visionary directorial excellence. This season’s The Golden Dragon and The Mysteries exemplify his bold and strikingly original imagination.

To the ensembles of Off-Broadway’s The Open House and Broadway’s The Realistic Joneses and to the creator of both plays, Will Eno: For two extraordinary casts and one impressively inventive playwright.

The Open House: Hannah Bos, Michael Countryman, Peter Friedman, Danny McCarthy, and Carolyn McCormick

The Realistic Joneses:Toni Collette, Michael C. Hall, Tracy Letts, and Marisa Tomei

Individual artists and productions singled out for these special awards are not eligible in their competitive categories.

PRODUCTIONS WITH MULTIPLE AWARDS

7 A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

3 Beautiful: The Carole King Musical

2 Twelfth Night*

2 After Midnight

2 All The Way

2 The Bridges of Madison County

2 The Glass Menagerie

2 Hedwig and the Angry Inch

2 Rocky

*Shakespeare’s Globe Production

Outer Critics Circle Announce Nominees!

Dear readers, dear cineastes the Outer Critics Circle has announced its’ list of nominations, the first of the season, with “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” leading the pack with 11 nominations. I’m shocked, shocked! At Disney’s sub-par(to put it mildly)”Aladdin” getting as many nods as it got. And Audra McDonald’s splendifrous “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grille” is in the Best Actress in a Musical category. Not Best Actress in a Play which she could’ve easily gotten, as there is as much play in “Lady Day” as their is singing.

Both Bryce Pinkham AND Jefferson Mays’ were both nominated for Best Actor in a Musical category, pitting them against each other and against Neil Patrick Harris for “Hedwig” which I’m seeing Friday. Surprisingly now Best Musical nomination for “Bridges of Madison County,” but it got nominated for Best Music.

And “Bullets Over Broadway” did not score in the Best Musical category, nor Best Director of a Musical,but it did get Best Featured Actress for Marrin (Mugsalot)Mazzie, and Best Choreography (Susan Stroman) and Best Costumes (William Ivey Long). The Outer Critics Circle is voted on byy critics whose outlets are outside the metropolitan area. Some call them the Bridge and Tunnel Awards.

64th Annual Awards

Outer Critics Circle Announce

2013-14 Season Nominees

“A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

Heads the List with 11 Nominations!

Followed by

8 for “Aladdin,” 7 for “Fun Home” & 6 for “Rocky”

The First Broadway/Off-Broadway Award Nominees of the Season!

Outer Critics Circle, the organization of writers and commentators covering New York theater for out-of-town newspapers, national publications and other media beyond Broadway, announced today (April 22, 2014) its nominees for the 2013-14 season in 24 categories. Stage and screen stars Cecily Tyson and Vanessa Williams presided over the (11AM) announcement ceremony at Manhattan’s Friars Club.

Celebrating its 64th season of bestowing awards of excellence in the field of theater, the Outer Critics Circle is an association with members affiliated with more than ninety newspapers, magazines, websites, radio and television stations, and theatre publications in America and abroad. The winners of the following categories will be announced on Monday, May 12th and the annual awards ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 22nd (4PM) at the legendary Sardi’s Restaurant.

– Nominations follow-

Outer Critics Circle

2013-2014 Award Nominations

OUTSTANDING NEW BROADWAY PLAY

Act One

All the Way

Casa Valentina

Outside Mullingar

The Realistic Joneses

OUTSTANDING NEW BROADWAY MUSICAL

After Midnight

Aladdin

Beautiful The Carole King Musical

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Rocky

OUTSTANDING NEW OFF-BROADWAY PLAY

Appropriate

Choir Boy

The Explorer’s Club

The Heir Apparent

Stage Kiss

OUTSTANDING NEW OFF-BROADWAY MUSICAL

Far From Heaven

Fun Home

Murder For Two

Storyville

What’s It All About? Bacharach Reimagined

OUTSTANDING BOOK OF A MUSICAL

(Broadway or Off-Broadway)

Aladdin

Beautiful The Carole King Musical

Fun Home

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Rocky

OUTSTANDING NEW SCORE

(Broadway or Off-Broadway)

Aladdin

The Bridges of Madison County

Fun Home

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

If / Then

OUTSTANDING REVIVAL OF A PLAY

(Broadway or Off-Broadway)

The Cripple of Inishmaan

The Glass Menagerie

Machinal

Twelfth Night

The Winslow Boy

OUTSTANDING REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL

(Broadway or Off-Broadway)

Cabaret

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill

Les Misérables

Violet

OUTSTANDING DIRECTOR OF A PLAY

Tim Carroll Twelfth Night

Michael Grandage The Cripple of Inishmaan

Lindsay Posner The Winslow Boy

Bill Rauch All the Way

Lyndsey Turner Machinal

OUTSTANDING DIRECTOR OF A MUSICAL

Warren Carlyle After Midnight

Laurence Connor & James Powell Les Misérables

Sam Gold Fun Home

Alex Timbers Rocky

Darko Tresnjak A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

OUTSTANDING CHOREOGRAPHER

Warren Carlyle After Midnight

Peggy Hickey A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Steven Hoggett & Kelly Devine Rocky

Casey Nicholaw Aladdin

Susan Stroman Bullets Over Broadway

OUTSTANDING SET DESIGN

(Play or Musical)

Christopher Barreca Rocky

Beowulf Boritt Act One

Bob Crowley Aladdin

Es Devlin Machinal

Alexander Dodge A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

OUTSTANDING COSTUME DESIGN

(Play or Musical)

Gregg Barnes Aladdin

Linda Cho A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

William Ivey Long Bullets Over Broadway

Jenny Tiramani Twelfth Night

Isabel Toledo After Midnight

OUTSTANDING LIGHTING DESIGN

(Play or Musical)
Kevin Adams Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Howell Binkley After Midnight

Paule Constable Les Misérables

Natasha Katz Aladdin

Philip S. Rosenberg A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

OUTSTANDING ACTOR IN A PLAY

Bryan Cranston All the Way

Ian McKellen No Man’s Land

Brían F. O’Byrne Outside Mullingar

Mark Rylance Twelfth Night

Tony Shaloub Act One

OUTSTANDING ACTRESS IN A PLAY

Tyne Daly Mothers and Sons

Rebecca Hall Machinal

Jessica Hecht Stage Kiss

Cherry Jones The Glass Menagerie

Estelle Parsons The Velocity of Autumn

OUTSTANDING ACTOR IN A MUSICAL

Michael Cerveris Fun Home

Neil Patrick Harris Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Andy Karl Rocky

Jefferson Mays A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Bryce Pinkham A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

OUTSTANDING ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL

Sutton Foster Violet

Audra McDonald Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill

Jessie Mueller Beautiful The Carole King Musical

Kelli O’Hara The Bridges of Madison County

Michelle Williams Cabaret

OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTOR IN A PLAY

Paul Chahidi Twelfth Night

Michael Cyril Creighton Stage Kiss

John McMartin All the Way

Alessandro Nivola The Winslow Boy

Brian J. Smith The Glass Menagerie

OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTRESS IN A PLAY

Barbara Barrie I Remember Mama

Andrea Martin Act One

Sophie Okonedo A Raisin in the Sun

Anika Noni Rose A Raisin in the Sun

Mare Winningham Casa Valentina

OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTOR IN A MUSICAL

Danny Burstein Cabaret

Nick Cordero Bullets Over Broadway

Joshua Henry Violet

James Monroe Iglehart Aladdin

Jarrod Specter Beautiful The Carole King Musical

OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL

Judy Kuhn Fun Home

Anika Larsen Beautiful The Carole King Musical

Sydney Lucas Fun Home

Marin Mazzie Bullets Over Broadway

Lisa O’Hare A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

OUTSTANDING SOLO PERFORMANCE

Jim Brochu Character Man

Debra Jo Rupp Becoming Dr. Ruth

Ruben Santiago-Hudson How I Learned What I Learned

Alexandra Silber Arlington

John Douglas Thompson Satchmo at the Waldorf

JOHN GASSNER AWARD

(Presented for an American play, preferably by a new playwright)

Scott Z. Burns The Library

Eric Dufault Year of the Rooster

Madeleine George The (Curious Case of the) Watson Intelligence

Steven Levenson The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin

Lauren Yee The Hatmaker’s Wife

Nominations Talley for 3 or more:

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder 11; Aladdin 8; Fun Home 7; Rocky 6; After Midnight 5; Beautiful 5;

Twelfth Night 5; Act One 4; All the Way 4; Bullets Over Broadway 4; Machinal 4; Cabaret 3; The Glass Menagerie 3; Hedwig and the Angry Inch 3; Les Miserables 3; Stage Kiss 3; Violet 3; The Winslow Boy 3

2013-14 Outer Critics Circle Executive / Nominating Committee

Simon Saltzman (President)

Mario Fratti (Vice-President) Patrick Hoffman (Corresponding Secretary)

Stanley L. Cohen (Treasurer) Glenn Loney (Historian & Member-at-Large)

Rosalind Friedman (Recording Secretary) and

Aubrey Reuben & Harry Haun (Members-at-Large)

Cicely Tyson First Standing Ovation of the TONY night!

Jake Gyllenhaal gives Cicely Tyson the Tony for Best Actress in a Play for “A Trip to Bountiful” . A well-deserved award for a beautiful, moving performance. And the only standing ovation of the evening ensued. And she gave an appropriately beautiful and moving speech. “The thumbprint of all who have touched me…”

And then Jake the Great gave Best Actress in a Musical to Patina Miller for “Pippin” who unfortunately I didn’t see because she was out that night.

She SHOULD have won it for “Sister Act” two years ago, as I told her at the Drama Desk Nominee Cocktail Party which you can see at http://www.youtube.com/StephenHoltShow

I saw “Pippin” and enjoyed it immensely, especially Andrea Martin and the circus elements.
But Patina’s understudy, Stephanie Pope, was just AWFUL, so that part of the musical was M.I.A. Ben Vereen won a Tony and built a career on doing THAT part?!?

I wish I had seen Patina, whom I like personally immensely.

I admire Tracey Letts’ performance in “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” but I didn’t expect him to be awarded for a role in a play that closed. “Virginia Woolf” won THREE big awards tonight. Best Director of a Play, Best Revival of a Play and now Best Actor.

This is probably a harbinger of more awards to come Oscartime when “August: Osage County” comes around starring Meryl Steep & Julia Roberts and produced by Harvey Weinstein.

Less than happy about Billy Porter of “KB” winning over Bertie Carvel for “Matilda.” I didn’t like his performance. Period.

And I’m REALLLLY upset about “Matilda” not winning Best Musical.That sort of ruined my night.

Tony Nominees ~ The Final Parsing

Dear Cineastes, dear readers, dear theatrelovers of literature, my Tony nominee show aired last week in my NYC cable TV time slot, and this week is another brand-new show containing interviews with Emma Roberts and Paul Giamatti and Tony nominee for Best Actor Bobby Cannavale.

The videos of this show have been up for awhile now on You Tube www.youtube.com/StephenHoltShow

But how right were we? And would I change anything now that so many of my critical colleagues have weighed in? And what HAS changed?

Well, for those you of you who don’t want to, or can’t, click on the above link for some reason, here’s the latest.

“The Book of Mormon” “The Book of Mormon” “The Book of Mormon” All three of us pundits on my show DID pick that, too. And it was the only time we all agreed. So that as they say is that. The question remains just how big are its’ coattails? Will it sweep in the Acting categories?

On my show, in the Best Actor in a Musical category, we all agreed that Andrew Rannells and Josh Gad would cancel each other out. But the NY Times’ Patrick Healy, thinks that Josh Gad might have a slight edge. Norbert Leo Butz is what my two TV colleagues said. And I felt it was Tony Shelton for “Priscilla Queen of the Desert.”

EVERYbody on Theatertalk, which shot a Tony show that I couldn’t find(it’s on You Tube under CUNY-TV) because of the pledge week goings-on, all thought Tony Shelton, too.

Norbert Leo Butz won the Drama Desk Award in this category and gave an evidently heart-rending speech. But how much of an overlap is there between the Tony Voters and the Drama Desk? If the show bookers, the tour operators, who supposedly make up  a sizable chunk of the Tony Voters, are looking to award someone who will tour…Tony Shelton is the most likely to do that…

Drag queens with awards? Well, the Tonys have a long history of that. Only last year Douglas Hodge won for his poignant plucky Zaza in the umpteenth revival of “La Cage Aux Folles” They like giving the Tony to an Old Man in a Dress.

But that’s a category that is definitely a toss-up with so many could-win contenders in it.

Two categories that have yielded a clear front runner since we filmed my show at the Bombay Palace restaurant…on a rainy day in May…are Best Actress in a Play, which I agreed at the time with Sherry Eaker, was Frances McDormand. And the other category is Best Actress in a Musical with Sutton Foster! My two compadres, Sherry and Scott Siegel, said Sutton, too. And everyone on Theatertalk did, too.

I said “Patina Miller” in “Sister Act” but since then Sutton seems to be experiencing a groundswell of support, just like “The Book of Mormon” and “Frances McDormand” are. The New York Times didn’t even mention Patina Miller!

The two revival categories~ Play and Musical~ also drew consensus. It’s “Normal Heart” and “Anything Goes” by all. Except me, who said “How To Succeed…”

Oh, Time Out New York agreed with this too. “Mormon”, McDormand and Sutton…

Best Actor in a Play is as up in the air as Best Actor in a Musical. I said Bobby Cannavale for “The Motherfucker with a Hat” but Sherry said “Mark Rylance” for “Jerusalelm” and Scott Siegel said “Al Pacino” for “Merchant of Venice.”

On Theatertalk(you really should try to watch it on YouTube. It’s worth the search.) Surprisingly someone who neither Sherry nor Scott nor I mentioned Joe Mantello from “A Normal Heart” was the consensus winner. With Mark Rylance on the outside. Time Out New York thought Rylance, too….

So THAT category is definitely a toss-up.

And Best Play? Another toss-up. With all four candidates having supporters. Me? I said “Motherfucker with a Hat”. And Scott and Sherry thought “War Horse” as did Time out and a lot of pundits on Theatertalk. “Good People” also just won the New York Critics Circle Award just today after FOUR ROUNDS of voting. And that says something…or does it?

Lots of surprises, toss-ups and blindsides in many, many categories this year, which means it’s been a VERY good year for Broadway.

Watch the Tonys on Sunday night at 8pm on CBS!

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: