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Posts tagged ‘A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder’

Elizabeth Williamson, new Associate Artistic Director, Hartford Stage

It is my great pleasure, dear readers, dear cineastes, dear lovers of theatre to introduce you to the very exciting and dynamic Elizabeth Williamson, the newly appointed associate artistic director of the Hartford Stage. Elizabeth has studied in London under Mark Wing-Davey, who is now the Head of NYU’s great Grad Acting program, and also at L’Ecole Jacques le Coq theatre in Paris, as well as being the Dramaturg at the Hartford Stage under the direction of Darko Tresnjak.

Elizabeth was the dramaturg and very involved with the development of Matthew Lopez’ new play “Reverberation” which I liked so much when I saw it in Hartford earlier this year. Her parents were both poets and she has a very bright future in the American Theater in front of her.

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Darko Tresnjak’s Excellent, Whip-Smart “Hamlet” in Hartford

Hamlet 2

I can’t stop raving about Darko Tresnjak’s rip-roaring, whip-smart production of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” now at the Hartford Stage. Following up on his Tony-award-winning Broadway triumph for Best Musical, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder”, where he himself won a Tony for Best Director, and Clint Eastwood announcing his win just said in that distinctive, rumbling voice of his “Darko”, Tresnjak immediately became iconic.

He is also the artistic director of the Hartford Stage Company, a venerable regional theater that he has notably injected new life into, coupled with the renewal of downtown Hartford, it is definitely a trip worth the making. But you’ve got to do it quick because this most excellent “Hamlet” is only running til this coming Sunday, Nov.16.

It’s selling out and you can see why. I wish New Yorkers could see just how vital and vivid this “Hamlet” is.

Tresnjak has decided to do this Shakespeare straight, no-frills in an accurately Elizabethan production, eye-poppingly costumed by Fabio Toblini with a stunningly simple but provocative set by Darko Tresnjak himself!

The Hartford’s thrust stage is in the form of an illuminated cross, strikingly and eerily lit from below by lighting designer Matthew Richards. The actors are literally walking on footlights.

One of the great banes of regional theater has always been its’ inability to attract the best of the best actors available to appear out-of-town, but this is not the case at all with this stunning “Hamlet.” It could be on Broadway. Or certainly in Central Park. Everyone everywhere deserves to see this excellent “Hamlet.” The citizens of Hartford are very lucky indeed.

Of course, “Hamlet” is only as a great as the Hamlet himself and Zach Appelman, whose career I have been following since the Yale School of Drama, is its’ unforgettable hero.

Still in his 20s’, he’s the youngest Hamlet I’ve ever seen, but that works like gang-busters, because the gloomy Dane’s rash and violent impetuosity is much more suited to a brash, hot-headed youth.

Appelman enters and holds the stage, as only someone with buckets of charisma could, with his hands clasped, as if in prayer. Whilst the gaudy, bawdy court around him is celebrating, he is lost in grief.

Appelman has a lazer-like focus on the text and speaks it beautifully, making the role absolutely his. His has a tremendous, elastic athleticism, making his climatic sword and dagger fight with Laertes ( the wonderful Anthony Roach) something remarkable and frightening at the same time. How many actors can wield a sword and Shakespeare’s verse with equal, spine-tingling skill? He nearly chokes his mother (Kate Forbes) to death in the famous closet scene as he also kills Polonius(a super Edward James Hyland).

Appelman also gets laughs out of Hamlet. Spunky and jaunty as well as clinically depressed by his uncle’s murder of his father, he is particularly witty as his takes the piss out of old Polonius. Veteran Edward James Hyland is also one of the best, funniest old court geezers I have ever seen, too.

Appelman switches from the sublime to the ridiculous with the ease of an Olivier. Have we ever seen a FUNNY Hamlet? The superb Appelman is not playing it for laughs, but finding the sly humor in the young, melancholy prince. You see that MAYBE he might have had a chance at happiness had all these tragic events not happened to him. And every laugh that Appelman and Hyland get are earned laughter springing from their apt characterizations.

Tresnjak really his knows his Shakespeare and it’s a joy to behold that he has a cast that is up to his challenges. Brittany Vicars is an appropriately ethereal, fragile Ophelia and Floyd King and Curtis Billings are a riot as the comical grave-diggers. In fact, Tresnjak has left in parts of their scene that are usually cut, which I was delighted to hear for the first time anywhere. Usually there is just ONE grave-digger, but in this longer scene, we actually hear their comical discussion of Ophelia’s suicide. If there was ever any question of what the river did to her and what she did to the river, the grave-diggers settle it once and for all.

And I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Tresnjak’s use of five students from the nearby Hartford-based colleges.Who knew that Harford was so culturally rich? I have to mention Conor M. Hammill, who excels as not only Francisco and Voltemand, but also a memorable Fortinbras,the Polish prince who ends the play. Who ever remembers Fortinbras? Well, you will this time. And Adam Montgomery is also very, very good as the flighty courtier Osric and a terrific player Queen. They both are currently still in school and what an education they are getting working with and holding their own against some of the best actors currently on this planet.

I can’t recommend this production of “Hamlet” highly enough! The trip is worth the trip.

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Steven Lutvak & Robert L. Freedman Winners of the Drama Desk Awards for Best Lyrics & Best Book for “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder”

And here’s my Tony Predictions Part three. Where I show you my interview with the super talented creators of “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” Composer Steven Lutvak, who won Best Lyrics at the Drama Desk and Robert L. Freedman who won for Best Book. They co-wrote the lyrics. And for the Tonys, I predict they could win across all these categories, too!

However, there’s the closed show “Bridges of Madison County” which won Best Music.

The Tony voters differ from the Drama Deskers in that they like to give their awards to shows THAT ARE STILL RUNNING. Which “A Gentleman’s Guide…” still is and getting bigger and bigger at the Box-Office all the time.

Jonathan Tunick, a legendary Orchestrator, could also win for “Best Orchestrations” continuing the “Gentleman’s Guide…” sweep.

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TONY Awards Predictions! Part One

TONY Awards Predictions! Part One

Dear readers, dear cineastes, dear lovers of theatre, it’s FINALLY that time of year again! The Tony Awards are upon us! Tomorrow night at 8pm on CBS! Can’t hardly wait!

And who’s going to win? Well, in a very competitive year, some awards have turned into slam dunks already on the awards circuit, and some, a few, well, maybe only one, are up in the air.

The undecided winner is going to be a real nail-biter, because it’s also the last award of the night. A very LONNNNG night for the nervous nominees.

And that of course would be Best Musical. The one Tony award that really carries real box-office clout. And that is a down to a photo finish between “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” which has the leading number of nominations with 10.

And it’s main and very threatening competitor is “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.”

If we were to go, like we Oscarologists always do, by the precursor awards, IOW, the other relevant awards that occur BEFORE the Tonys themselves, I would have to say it going to be “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder”. It won the Outer Critics Circle Award and also the prestigious Drama Desk Award. And it lead the Drama Desks with seven wins just this past Sunday.

So it’s all over in the category. Isn’t it? Well, no.

The OCC and the DD as they are abbreviated are voted on solely by press and critics. And a few years back, the Tonys dumped nearly all their critical, review-writing journalistic members. And now their membership of nearly 800, consists mainly of Broadway producers. And their mind-set is very, very different from that of the critics, who they rightly or wrongly consider their adversaries.

And pundits keep mentioning that frightening one hundred or so stat that represents the road producers. They are the members who are scattered across the country and whose houses host Broadway shows that are touring the country.

The received wisdom is that they might favor a show that would be easier to tour. Hence the rise of “Beautiful:The Carole King Musical” in pundit consideration. It is a great show. And you are ALREADY humming the music BEFORE you go in, because they are all the great songs that one of America’s greatest song-writers, Carole King wtote.

We grew up on these songs. Well, I did anyway, and I love them all. It’s perhaps the greatest juke-box musical ever written. Or it’s right up their with “Jersey Boys,” the most successful juke-box musical of all time that is soon to be a Clint Eastwood directed film, opening in two weeks.

So, will familiarity trump orginality? “A Gentleman’s Guide…” is a totally original work, although iit is based, somewhat, on the great Alec Guiness movie “Kind Hearts and Coronets.” I love that movie. And I love “A Gentleman’s Guide…” I voted for it. And think the Tony voters are going to honor it, too.

It may even sweep. I think, like at the Drama Desk Awards, it will win Best Director of a Musical, the wildly inventive Darko Tresnjak, who also incidentally won the Drama Desk Award.

I had the honor of interviewing Mr. Tresnjak, and also his collaborators in ” Love and Murder” Steven Lutvak, who won Best Lyrics at the Drama Desk. Along with his co-lyricist Robert L. Freedman. In Parts Two and Three of my Tony predictions on this blog, I’m going to post the interviews I just did with all three at the various Drama Desk festivities. Stay tuned!

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Bryce Pinkham, the Gentleman of ” A Gentleman’s Guide…”

The super-hot new leading man/matinee idol on Broadway this season is Bryce Pinkham, the titular gentleman of “A Gentleman Guide to Love and Murder”, which just won 7 Drama Desk Awards drops by “The Stephen Holt Show” at the Drama Desk Awards themselves. Bryce is nice. No really, he is not anything like the villainous characters he has played on Broadway in “Ghost” and now the kinder, gentler semi-villain, semi-hero of “A Gentleman’s Guide…” which has earned him a Tony nomination for Best Actor in a Musical. He talks about this and his background as a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

Videography ~ Jack Siberine

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Gentleman’s Guide Sweeps Drama Desk Awards with 7!!!

Gentlemen's 1Gentlemen's Guide 2Gentleman's Guide Sweeps Drama Desk Awards with 7!!!

It was quite a big night for wit and brilliance on Broadway as the super-smart “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” swept the Drama Desk Awards tonight with seven wins at a gala awards presentation at Town Hall. The glamourous packed audience roared its’ approval.

It won Best Musical, Best Actor in a Musical Jefferson Mays, Best Featured Actress in a Musical, Lauren Worsham, Best Director of a Musical Darko Tresnjak, Best Book of a Musical Robert L. Freedman, Best Lyrics Steven Lutvak and Robert L. Freedman, Best Projection Design in a Musical Aaron Rhyne.

I only wish it could’ve been a three way tie, and the stupendous Bryce Pinkham, who was also nominated for Best Actor in a Musical, could’ve won, too. And Lisa O’Hare should’ve been nominated, too, for her super-slinky Sibella.And may I say, Steven Lutvak should’ve won for his glittering score. And so should the set and costumes, too! I’m such a fan! I hope it sweeps the Tonys, also! I think it will.

The unusual,odd occurance of a double tie, something that has never happened before in my memory as a Voting Member of the Drama Desk, happened tonight as Best Actor in a Musical, the most hotly contended of all the categories, except perhaps Best Musical, got BOTH Neil Patrick Harris of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” AND Jefferson Mays, as I said, Best Actor in a Musical Awards.

And in Best Featured Actress in a Musical, Lauren Gorsham, as the colortura soprana ingenue Phoebe in “A Gentleman’s Guide…” tied with Anika Larsen, of “Beautiful” who plays Carole King’s wise-cracking best friend and rival composer. Interestingly both actresses were profiled together in a New York Times article that combined the two lovely young performers and strangely predicted the tie in their category.

Audra McDonald won Best Actress in a Play for “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grille” for her searing, elegiac performance of the late Billie Holliday in the last days of her life. Many thought she was in the wrong category since she sings over a dozen of Holiday’s greatest hits in the show that is presented as if it were in a supper club as the audience is grouped in small cocktail tables on what is usually the floor of the orchestra of the Circle in the Square theater.

But it mattered not what category she was in to the Drama Deskers, who voted her Best Actress in a Play anyway! Didn’t think they would, but they did! Damn the semantics! Full speed ahead to the Tonys! Where she might become the very first performer to ever win SIX!?! If she wins there, too. If she won this big award, from the persnickety Drama Desk voters, (she already won the Outer Critics Circle), she’ll win the Tony, too, I think. DONE!

How many Drama Desk Awards has she won? More than Tonys even, I bet!

Best Actress in a Musical was Jessie Mueller as Carole King in “Beautiful,” a juke box musical consisting of Carole King’s many many hit songs.

Best Actor in a play went to Bryan Cranston in “All the Way” which also won Best Play.

All these performers in the major categories, Audra McDonald, Brian Cranston and Jessie Mueller could very well repeat at the Tonys NEXT Sunday night June 8. But who will win Best Actor in a Musical? Will both Jefferson Mays and Neil Patrick Harris tie again? This is something that has never happened at the Tonys. Stay tuned!!!

A complete list of the winners, as well as the nominees, is below. The winner are highlighted in bold.

http://www.DramaDeskAwards.com
DRAMA DESK AWARD NOMINEES FOR THE 2013-2014 SEASON
(WINNERS IN BOLD)

Outstanding Play
Nell Benjamin, The Explorers Club
Steven Levenson, Core Values
Conor McPherson, The Night Alive
Richard Nelson, Regular Singing
Bruce Norris, Domesticated
Robert Schenkkan, All the Way
John Patrick Shanley, Outside Mullingar

Outstanding Musical
A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Aladdin
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Fun Home
Love’s Labour’s Lost
Rocky
The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Revival of a Play
I Remember Mama
London Wall
No Man’s Land
Of Mice and Men
The Cripple of Inishmaan
The Model Apartment
Twelfth Night*

*Shakespeare’s Globe Production

Outstanding Revival of a Musical
Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Les Misérables
Violet

Outstanding Actor in a Play
Bryan Cranston, All the Way
Hamish Linklater, The Comedy of Errors
Ian McKellen, No Man’s Land
David Morse, The Unavoidable Disappearance of Tom Durnin
Chris O’Dowd, Of Mice and Men
Daniel Radcliffe, The Cripple of Inishmaan
Denzel Washington, A Raisin in the Sun

Outstanding Actress in a Play
Barbara Andres, I Remember Mama
Tyne Daly, Mothers and Sons
Audra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill
Laurie Metcalf, Domesticated
J. Smith-Cameron, Juno and the Paycock
Harriet Walter, Julius Caesar

Outstanding Actor in a Musical
Neil Patrick Harris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch TIE!
Adam Jacobs, Aladdin
Andy Karl, Rocky
Jefferson Mays, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder TIE!
Steven Pasquale, The Bridges of Madison County
Bryce Pinkham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Outstanding Actress in a Musical
Sutton Foster, Violet
Idina Menzel, If/Then
Jessie Mueller, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Kelli O’Hara, The Bridges of Madison County
Margo Seibert, Tamar of the River
Barrett Wilbert Weed, Heathers: The Musical

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play
Reed Birney, Casa Valentina
Chuck Cooper, Choir Boy
Peter Maloney, Outside Mullingar
Bobby Moreno, Year of the Rooster
Bill Pullman, The Jacksonian
Brian J. Smith, The Glass Menagerie

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play
Betty Buckley, The Old Friends
Julia Coffey, London Wall
Diane Davis, The Model Apartment
Celia Keenan-Bolger, The Glass Menagerie
Jan Maxwell, The Castle
Sophie Okonedo, A Raisin in the Sun

Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical
Danny Burstein, Cabaret
Nick Cordero, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Joshua Henry, Violet
James Monroe Iglehart, Aladdin
Rory O’Malley, Nobody Loves You
Bobby Steggert, Big Fish

Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical
Stephanie J. Block, Little Miss Sunshine
Anika Larsen, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical (tie)
Adriane Lenox, After Midnight
Sydney Lucas, Fun Home
Laura Osnes, The Threepenny Opera
Jennifer Simard, Disaster!
Lauren Worsham, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder (tie)

Outstanding Director of a Play
Joe Calarco, A Christmas Carol
Tim Carroll, Twelfth Night
Thomas Kail, Family Furniture
Bill Rauch, All the Way
Anna D. Shapiro, Domesticated
Julie Taymor, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Outstanding Director of a Musical
Sam Gold, Fun Home
Michael Mayer, Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Bartlett Sher, The Bridges of Madison County
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Alex Timbers, Rocky
Darko Tresnjak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Outstanding Choreography
Warren Carlyle, After Midnight
Steven Hoggett, Kelly Devine, Rocky
Danny Mefford, Love’s Labour’s Lost
Casey Nicholaw, Aladdin
Susan Stroman, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Sonya Tayeh, Kung Fu

Outstanding Music
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Andrew Lippa, Big Fish
Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Alan Menken, Aladdin
Kevin Murphy and Laurence O’Keefe, Heathers: The Musical
Jeanine Tesori, Fun Home

Outstanding Lyrics
Howard Ashman, Tim Rice, and Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Michael Friedman, Love’s Labour’s Lost
Michael Korie, Far from Heaven
Lisa Kron, Fun Home

Outstanding Book of a Musical
Chad Beguelin, Aladdin
Robert L. Freedman, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Joe Kinosian and Kellen Blair, Murder for Two
Lisa Kron, Fun Home
Douglas McGrath, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Marsha Norman, The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Orchestrations
Jason Robert Brown, The Bridges of Madison County
John Clancy, Fun Home
Larry Hochman, Big Fish
Steve Sidwell, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Michael Starobin, If/Then
Jonathan Tunick, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

Outstanding Music in a Play
Lewis Flinn, The Tribute Artist
Elliot Goldenthal, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Rob Kearns, The Life and Sort of Death of Eric Argyle
Tom Kochan, Almost, Maine
Nico Muhly, The Glass Menagerie
Duncan Sheik, A Man’s a Man

Outstanding Revue
After Midnight
I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Musik from the Weimar and Beyond
Le Jazz Hot: How the French Saved Jazz
Til Divorce Do Us Part
What’s It All About? Bacharach Reimagined

Outstanding Set Design
Christopher Barreca, Rocky
Alexander Dodge, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Richard Hoover, Small Engine Repair
Santo Loquasto, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Ian MacNeil, A Doll’s House
Donyale Werle, The Explorers Club

Outstanding Costume Design
Constance Hoffman, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
William Ivey Long, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Zane Pihlstrom, Nutcracker Rouge
Loren Shaw, The Mysteries
Jenny Tiramani, Twelfth Night
David C. Woolard, The Heir Apparent

Outstanding Lighting Design
Christopher Akerlind, Rocky
Jane Cox, Machinal
David Lander, The Civil War
Peter Mumford, King Lear
Brian Tovar, Tamar of the River
Japhy Weideman, Macbeth

Outstanding Projection Design
Robert Massicotte and Alexis Laurence, Cirkopolis
Sven Ortel, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Aaron Rhyne, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Shawn Sagady, All the Way
Austin Switser, Sontag: Reborn
Ben Rubin, Arguendo

Outstanding Sound Design in a Musical
Kai Harada, Fun Home
Peter Hylenski, Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical
Peter Hylenski, Rocky
Brian Ronan, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Dan Moses Schreier, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder
Jon Weston, The Bridges of Madison County

Outstanding Sound Design in a Play
M.L. Dogg, The Open House
Katie Down, The Golden Dragon
Paul James Prendergast, All the Way
Dan Moses Schreier, Act One
Christopher Shutt, Love and Information
Matt Tierney, Machinal

Outstanding Solo Performance
David Barlow, This is My Office
Jim Brochu, Character Man
Hannah Cabell, Grounded
Debra Jo Rupp, Becoming Dr. Ruth
Ruben Santiago-Hudson, August Wilson’s How I Learned What I Learned
John Douglas Thompson, Satchmo at the Waldorf

Unique Theatrical Experience
Charlatan
Cirkopolis
Mother Africa
Nothing to Hide
Nutcracker Rouge
The Complete & Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene O’Neill Vol.

Special Awards Each year, the Drama Desk votes special awards to recognize excellence and significant contributions to the theater. For 2013-2014, these awards are:

To Soho Rep.: For nearly four decades of artistic distinction, innovative production, and provocative play selection.

To Veanne Cox: For her ability to express the eccentricities, strengths, and vulnerabilities of a range of characters, and notably for her comedic flair as evidenced in this season’s The Old Friends and The Most Deserving.

To Ed Sylvanus Iskandar, the Sam Norkin Off-Broadway Award: For his visionary directorial excellence. This season’s The Golden Dragon and The Mysteries exemplify his bold and strikingly original imagination.

To the ensembles of Off-Broadway’s The Open House and Broadway’s The Realistic Joneses and to the creator of both plays, Will Eno: For two extraordinary casts and one impressively inventive playwright.

The Open House: Hannah Bos, Michael Countryman, Peter Friedman, Danny McCarthy, and Carolyn McCormick

The Realistic Joneses:Toni Collette, Michael C. Hall, Tracy Letts, and Marisa Tomei

Individual artists and productions singled out for these special awards are not eligible in their competitive categories.

PRODUCTIONS WITH MULTIPLE AWARDS

7 A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder

3 Beautiful: The Carole King Musical

2 Twelfth Night*

2 After Midnight

2 All The Way

2 The Bridges of Madison County

2 The Glass Menagerie

2 Hedwig and the Angry Inch

2 Rocky

*Shakespeare’s Globe Production

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Drama Desk Award Predictions

Drama Desk Award Predicitons

Yes, the Drama Desk Awards are coming up fast! They are handed out on June 1 next Sunday at Town Hall.

And here are my intrepid predictions! I think critic’s fave “A Gentlemen’s Guide to Love and Valor” (pictured above ^) Will sweep and get the Best Musical Award and all the others in that musical category. Best Music, Best Lyrics, Best Book, Best Orchestrations(the great Jonathan Tunick, natch.)

And in the hardest fought battle Best Actor in a Musical, I think the Drama Desk-ers being all critics are going to also choose actor’s actor Jefferson Mays for his eight(or nine) roles in “A Gentlemen’s Guide…” over the much more famous Neil Patrick Harris in “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.” Though when the Tonys come up the following week, we could see this reversed.

“Hedwig” will get Best Revival of a Musical. And I think “All the Way” though I LOATHED it myself will get Best Play. THREE HOURS OF HAM! I mean, I like ham. But THREE HOURS!?!?

However, I think the Drama Desk-ers will vote for it. Though something less known might surprise here. It could be anything, if it’s not the obvious Tony front-runner.

Best Actor in a Play will PROBABLY be Bryan Cranston in “All the Way” as LBJ. Another Tony front-runner. Chris O’Dowd in “Of Mice and Men” could be the surprise upset here. And this would REALLY be a surprise.

Best Actress in a Play may very well go to Tyne Daly for “Mothers and Sons”. Though with Audra McDonald in this category, too, it could be Audra. Though the Drama Desk-ers, being all critics through and through. and sticklers for detail, may balk at the Five-Time Tony Winner being put in this category though she sings an endless amount of memorable period songs. Audra won the Outer Critics Circle but she was in Best Actress in A Musical there, not Best Actress in a Play.

Best Actress in a Musical will also be Tony front-runner Jessie Mueller for “Beautiful:The Carole King Musical” where she’s amazingly effective as the ugly ducking who becomes a swan/superstar.

Best Revival of a Play will be “Twelfth Night.” It’s no longer running, but that won’t bother the Drama Desk-ers, who don’t take that into consideration, the way the Tony voters do.

Best Revue will be “After Midnight.”

The Drama Desk Awards are the only awards in all of theater, let it be said, that honor Broadway, Off-Broadway and Off-Off Broadway equally, on an even playing field.

And the prestige of these awards has increased since the press are no long allowed to vote for the Tony Awards!

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