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Archive for the ‘Broadway’ Category

A Special “Julius Caesar” in the Park Shout Out

I attended the Public Theater’s latest offering “Julius Caesar” last night in their outdoor Delacourte Theater, and I am embargoed from writing a review of it until 11pm Monday Night.

But this is what I can do.

I can send a special Stephen Holt Show Shout out to the following whose names are buried in the very BACK of the hefty, glossy program. And they are _

Matt Baguth, Raul Ramon Belcomo,Laura Borgwardt, Ethan Botwick,Estaban Barcoma,Nic Casaula, Caerwon Clarke, George Colligan, Mia Walsh Corbett, Cassandra Cushman, William Donovan, Tama Faiilianga, Deon Frank, Amanda Cate Fuller, Christopher Garofalo, Ian Garrity,Logan Georges, Morgan Hahn,Andrew Harriss, Kana Hatakeyama, Jeff Hathcoat, Buck Hinkle, Marley Nykole, James, Josh Jeffers,Karen Johal,Diana Lauren Jones,Logan Keeler,David H. Littleton, Reagan Lopez, Leslie Marseglia, Maribel Martinez, Nadege Matteis, Katie Morrill, Keaton Morris-Stan, Catherine D. Mullins,Jon L Peacock, Cheryl Pickett, Isabelle Pierre, Mark Puchinsky, Melissa Rakiro, Kyra Riley, Arisael Rivera, Joshua Salavador,Rachel Schmeling, Monique ST.Cyr,Michael Patrick Trimm, Nicole Vasquez, Loran F.Walker,Toran White, Conor William Wright, Janie Ye.

And last but not least, Gideon McCarty, who actually is credited in the Cast List of the Program. Oh and Erick Betancourt, too. And my favorite new name on Broadway, Dash King.

#Julius Caesar, #Public Theater, #Delacourt Theater, #Julius Caesar, #Central Park, #Gideon McCarty, #Dash King

Congratulations to Susan Haskins & Theatertalk!

Now that’s it’s been publicly announced on the air on PBS tonight on Theatertalk, I can say congratulations to Susan Haskins for winning (her first) Emmy! And she graciously and generously thanked me for introducing her to “the brilliant and impossible Michael Riedel” and she called me a “Public Access Legend.” And the Susan Haskinsterm has stuck. Which has very kind of her.
I now wear a hat that a kind friend gave me for my birthday that says “Puhlic Access Legend”.
There’s almost no woman who against all odds has done so much for American Theater. She’s been doing it for 25 Years.
Especially when there’s so little coverage of theater anymore in NYC. She’s doing what Ed Sullivan used to do. Congratulations, Susan!

 

TONY Predictions 2017!


I am so in love with the idea that this year’s Tony Awards might heavily feature two of my all time favorite theatrical events. “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812” the genre-busting pop-opera and “Little Foxes” which makes audiences (and critics) see double with the divine Laura Linney switching up with Cynthia Nixon. I admit to bias here, but I have the Drama Desks Awards this past Sunday to second my emotions.

Yes, I think “Natasha, Pierre…” will win many, many of its 10 nominations on TONY night, this coming Sunday. Including, I’m calling it now, Best Musical, Best Director of a Musical Rachel Chavkin, who won the DD on Sunday, Best Set of a Musical Mimi Lien, Best Lighting of a Musical, and Best Orchestrations Dave Malloy, who also wrote the incredibly, ketchy and thrilling  sung-through musical score, which may also get Malloy ANOTHER Tony in that hotly contested category.

I’m going to go with the more influential than ever Drama Desk Winner for Best Actor in a Musical and think that in a surprise Andy Karl will prevail in this category.He tore his ACL, and I’ve torn mine and trust me, it’s VERY, VERY painful, and takes a LONG time to heal, and Karl, formerly nominated as Bway’s “Rocky” overcame this excruciating experience to OPEN “GROUND HOG DAY” and continue on performing it, singing and dancing as he did before, turning it into a hit, where people are coming to see HIM as well as the show. He also won an Olivier Award in London for this performance. THAT counts bigly with Tony Voters.

And his HUGE, BLACK, frightening-looking knee brace is in full view the ELEVEN times he has to change into his clothes in front of the audience. And he’s clearly in pain doing all this. This counts heavily with the TONY voters, who know the show must go on, no matter what the pain level.

I think Broadway vet Karl wins this category over 23-year-old newcomer Ben Platt in “Dear Evan Hansen.” The TONY voters, I have to add, are older and more homogeneous than even the #Oscarssowhite Academy members. Yes, AMPAS is more diverse and forward thinking than the TONYs. And pain counts. Ben Platt will have other chances.

They’re not necessarily going to GET a musical about the Internet. Some of them DON’T EVEN HAVE INTERNET. So…It’s too young for TONY, but “Natasha, Pierre…” is a masterpiece based on a masterpiece, Tolstoy’s “War and Peace”, so it’s just right. It’s got the most nominations. It’s right in the Tony voters comfort zone(s). Usually the show with the most nominations wins. Let’s see if that holds true this year on Sunday night when the awards are handed out at 8pm EST on CBS.

Surprisingly, “Natasha, Pierre…” won in EVERY CATEGORY for the Drama Desks that it was nominated for. And because it opened earlier Off-Off Bway, it was only eligible for the parts of it that were NEW to this production. And those category were Best Director of a Musical, Best Set of a Musical, Best Choreography and Best Orchestrations.

Another category that I think “NPATGCO1812” will win is Best Featured Actor in a Musical. I think the TONYs will help the astonishing Lucas Steele along on his way to mega-stardom. It doesn’t hurt that though he’s cited as Supporting, he has a larger part than Pop Superstar Josh Groban, who is also nominated in the lead category, where he faces Karl AND Platt, unfortunately, or the award  handily would be his.

Lucas Steele is Anatole, Groban’s Pierre’s wayward, hedonistic brother-in-law, a very, complicated. LARGE part of the villain, as it were, of the extremely small section of “War and Peace” that has here been excerpted. He’s hot. He’s a little dumb. And he plays the violin. And he’s charismatic beyond belief and has been with “NPATGCO1812” for FIVE YEARS in all its’ growing and re-growing on its’ way to Bway. And he hits notes that are stratospheric, to say the least.

Bway vet Gavin Creel of “Hello, Dolly”, although he won the Drama Desk Award in this category, is funny, yes. But that’s about all there is to that part. , AND he was not up against his main competition, Lucas Steele that night.

Bette Midler, of course, even though she DIDN’T SHOW to pick up her Drama Desk win, as Best Actress in a Musical, will easily win in this category.

If I’m leaving out Best Play, it’s because “Oslo,” a play that bored me to death, has won every other Best Play award this year. And,yes, will probably devour the TONY, too. I wish my former guest Michael Aronov was going to win Best Featured Actor in a Play.

But I think that award, like it did at the Drama Desks, will go to Danny DeVito for “The Price.”LITTLE fOXES 3lITTLE FOXES 14

And as far as the Supporting or Featured Actresses are concerned, I think, like the Drama Desk it will go to Jenn Collela for “Come From Away.” And Best Featured Actress in a Play will be Cynthia Nixon. Pairing up for a win with her co-star Laura Linney, giving the performance(s) of their careers in the brilliantly double cast “Little Foxes.”  What a theatrical event! And this was all Laura’s IDEA! And the Tony Voters know it and she’s never won.</a
And Best Actor in a Play? Oops, I almost forgot. Kevin Kline in “Present Laughter” and yes, he won the Drama Desk, too.

#Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812, #Josh Groban, #Lucas Steele, #Bette Midler # Hello, Dolly, #Gavin Creel, #Dear Evan Hansen, #Ben Platt, #Andy Karl, #Groundhog Day, #Kevin Kline, #Present Laughter #Rachel Chavkin, #Laura Linney, #Little Foxes, # Cynthia Nixon

“Natasha, Pierre” Wins Most Drama Desks – 4! Laura Linney AND Cynthia Nixon Both Win!Bette Midler & Andy Karl score, too!

Drama Desk Awards 2917The 62nd Drama Desk Awards are now in the history books, and are they perhaps predicting the Tony winners?

Natasha, Pierre 20Natasha, Pierre Broadway Set“Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812” won all four awards, the most it was eligible for, the most it could win. Since it opened several years ago at the Ars Nova theater Off Off Broadway, it’s not nominated for the ten awards it’s up for ON Broadway. But the Acting Categories it IS predicting, I think are Best Actress and Featured Actress in a Play both of which went to Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon for “Little Foxes.”  Laura gave a beautiful speech. If TONY winners saw it…She was a very popular win.lITTLE FOXES 14Laura Linney OCC 1

I guess the headline was that Bette Midler didn’t show to accept HER award for “Hello, Dolly!”Hello Dolly 11But Gavin Creel did. He claimed to be “unfunny” and that director Jerry Zaks made him “funny.”Michael Urie Tux

Certainly funny AND charming was host Michael Urie who really aced this tricky show. He even jumped up high to give towering presenter the legendary Tommy Tune a kiss! Tune shockingly quipped “the last person to kiss me at one of these things was Leonard Bernstein.”…Pause for huge laugh…”He gave me tongue,” Pause for another huge laugh. “And I LIKED IT!” Applause.

It was one of the slickest evenings in the Drama Desks chequered and long and distinguished history. It was certainly a very high point. And I am proud beyond words to be part of this organization. It enables me to see all these wonderful shows and to write about them and to bring them to you on my blog and my TV show. I’ve been a member for over twenty years, or more. But who’s counting? It’s work I love to do.

True story. I voted for most of tonight’s winners. Showing you one’s vote DOES count. I prefigured nearly every award in the design categories, and Andy Karl winning for Best Actor for “Groundhog Day.” He quipped “This is the biggest pity award I’ve ever gotten.” Referring to the fact, and he referenced it by tripping on his way up to the stage, but then making like it was a joke and he was fine. But seriously, he did tear his ACL right before the show opened and to this day, he wears a massive knee brace, which as he is in his underwear almost constantly, (11 times, but who’s counting?) in the course of the show. Andy Karl on mike

It IS “Groundhog Day” after all.

“Hello, Dolly!” in addition to winning for Midler and Creel also won Best Revival of a Musical and the Canadian musical “Come From Away,” as I predicted it might, won three awards including Best Musical. And also Best Supporting Actress for Jenn Collela.

Danny DeVito won for Best Featured Actor in a Play for “The Price.”

Here’s the list of shows by number of winners who reached more than two.

Wins by Production:

 

Kevin Geer Passes

It is with the heaviest of hearts that I have to report that I’ve only just discovered that my life-long friend Kevin Geer passed away. In January. He was 64. I always felt we traveled in approximately the same  theatrical circles, but I guess not. I’m absolutely shocked at his passing. He was always the Spirit of Youth to me.

I met him at La Mama in 1972 when I was working at the box-office at 74A East Fourth St. He was with Gerome Ragni, the late co-author of “Hair”, whom he lived with until Ragni died many years later.

Kevin hadn’t even BEGUN to act yet, but he was studying it, with Gerri’s support, and I immediately felt he had star quality. He had a strapping build and chiseled leading man features, even then. His father, whom he never knew, was evidently also an actor in Hollywood. He once told me “I met a fella who said he knew my Dad.” He said that “He was very handsome and a very good actor.” Which is what Kevin always wanted to be. From his earliest days. And what he became, an actor’s actor.

I’m happy to say that he was featured prominently in two of my early plays and that they perhaps constituted his stage debuts, certainly his earliest roles.

He played ironically a character called “The Spirit of Death” which was supposed to emblemify the Actor’s Studio. He was always dressed in a black turtle neck and was often carrying a dead seagull. This was in my autobiographical musical “Audition” in 1972. I was 24 and decided it was time for a look back…I had had a teacher in college who was obsessed with the Actor’s Studio, and I just did  NOT fit in to that traditional mold. And..well, enough of that…

Kevin and Agosto Machado, who also appeared in “Audition”, were standing under a tattered awning on St. Mark’s Place and the Bowery that said “Two Saints.” It inspired me to make my first movie, only ten minutes or so with Agosto standing in for both parts because Kevin was squeamish at the time, of playing Agosto’s counterpart. They remained friends for Kevin’s life, and they really were, as I thought that summery day in the ’70s “Two Saints.”

Agosto Machado is the renowned downtown Asian transvestite. He and I were both in Jackie Curtis’ “Vain Victory” a Warhol extravaganza, that I think Kevin and Gerri Ragni came to see nearly every night. In 1972. And so did Bette Middler. That was where she got the idea of being a mermaid in a wheelchair. Candy Darling was a mermaid in it who longed for legs, and I was her greedy, demanding stage mother, Nunca the Divine.

It was about that time that Kevin also. quite accidentally, was filmed for the “American Family”, the ground-breaking Reality TV documentary, at the Chelsea Hotel talking with Holly Woodlawn about seeing “Vain Victory.” He was in the late Lance Loud’s room. Lance had taken his straight-laced Mother Pat to see “Vain Victory.” And she famously did not like it.

Kevin is seen in a scene sitting on Lance’s bed, describing his awed reaction to the nearly all-drag queen performance, and commenting particularly on the 6 foot plus ballerina Ekaterina Sobechenskaya. Who was played by the late Larry Ree. That cast also contained Candy Darling, Mario Montez, Eric Emerson…and me. As Candy Darling’s mother. Kevin told me it was his first week in New York.

Kevin gave what I always thought of as his greatest performance in my play “Men.” He played the part of “The Boy” opposite the late, great Ridiculous director John Vacarro’s amazing, brave turn as “The Man.” He was an ex-drag queen who cruised Men’s Rooms in the Broadway Central Welfare hotel, as did this lost Boy that Kevin embodied so unforgettably. His character was always being beaten up there. The Man saves him. I think the lines were-

BOY: Mister, what should I do? What should I do with my life?

MAN: Take the moment, baby. Take it. It’s all we’ve got. It’s all we’re given.

It was one of the first Out Gay plays, and I’m very proud of all who were involved in it. including Christine Ebersole, in a wordless walk-on as a “Dyke with Cigarette.” She was just out of NYU Tisch Acting School, and I have no doubt that Kevin, had he lived, would’ve been right up there on the Great White Way with her.

Actually, his back on the poster of “Dude” was immortalized in one of Broadway’s great flops. He played Dude, the title role that would have made him an instant star. It was written for him as a tribute by Ragni, but he was fired from it, but producers who I always felt were jealous of Kevin and Ragni’s relationship.

After Gerri’s death, Kevin was able to survive and thrive on his own, even so far as acting on Broadway in “Side Man” and “Twelve Angry Men.”

He’s the big guy on the far left of this “Side Man” picture.

He was well on his way to establishing himself as his own man and his own independent, always working actor.

According to the New York Times obit, he had no survivors, but he will be deeply missed by all his theater friends.

Dina Merrill, Actress, Philanthropist, Passes

Dina MerrillDina Merrill Hartley (born Nedenia Marjorie Hutton; December 29, 1923-May 22, 2017) was an American actress, businesswoman and philanthropist.  She died peacefully at home surrounded by her family.

Merrill was born in New York City on December 29, 1923. She was the only child of Post Cereals heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post and her second husband, the Wall Street investment broker Edward Francis “E.F.” Hutton.

 She adopted the stage name Dina Merrill, borrowing from Charles E. Merrill, a distant relative and a famous stockbroker like her father. Merrill made her debut on the stage in the play The Mermaid Singing in 1945.  During World War II, she was part of the Moss Hart USO troupe and performed throughout the Pacific Theatre of Operations. Her stage career in regional and Broadway theatre took off after the war and continued through the 1990’s including the1983 Broadway revival of the Rodgers & Hart musical On Your Toes.

 Merrill appeared in more than 25 feature films including Desk Set (1957), Operation Petticoat, The Sundowners (1960),Butterfield 8 (1960), The Young Savages (1961), The Courtship of Eddie’s Father , and Robert Altman’s A Wedding (1978) andThe Player (1992).

 Merrill appeared on more than 100 television shows varying from What’s My Line to The Magnificent Ambersons.

Merrill has been married three times. In 1946 she wed Stanley M. Rumbough, Jr. and had 3 children, including David Rumbough (d. 1973)

In 1966 she married Oscar-winning actor Cliff Robertson, with whom she had Heather Robertson (d. 2007)

 In 1990’s, Merrill and her third husband, Ted Hartley, merged their company, Pavilion Communications, with the famed RKO to form RKO Pictures which made a number of feature films including Mighty Joe Young (with Disney).

 Merrill devoted a great deal of her time to public and charitable service. She was Chairman of the board and Director emeritus with over 50 years of service to the New York City Mission Society. When her son David was diagnosed with diabetes, Dina founded the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, dedicated to diabetic research. She served as the International Ambassador for ORBIS International, the flying eye hospital which teaches advanced eye care and eye surgical techniques all over the world.

 Ms. Merrill was an energetic supporter of the performing arts. She was a founding t of te O’Neill Theater Center and an early director of the Paley Media Center. She served for 12 years as presidential appointee to the Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. She was honored by Guild Hall, where she performed on stage for many summers in East Hampton, NY,by the naming of their theater and back theater spaces the Dina Merrill Pavilion.

She was a trustee of the Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens in Washington, DC.

She also served as a board member of the Population Resource Council and the Republican Majority for Choice Committee promoting “choice” for women and was a founding vice chairman of the Pro-Choice Coalition.

As a corporate leader, she served as the Vice Chairman of RKO Pictures and was actively involved in many of its productions and activities. She has served on the Board of Directors of E.F. Hutton Company and the Board of Lehman Brothers.

She is survived by her loving husband Ted Hartley, son Stanley Hutton Rumbough, and ughter Nedenia Rumbough Roosenburg and six grandchildren.

Burial services will be private for the family.  Celebrations of Dina’s life will be scheduled iks to come.

Remembrances of Dina could be sent in her name to:

Orbis International, 520 8th Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY, 1001

–        O’Neill Theatre Foundation, The Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, 305 Great Neck Road, Waterford, CT 06385

10037, Attention: Development Office

  Hillwood Estate Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20008

 Messages of condolence will be gratefully received at dinamerrillremembered@rko.com

“Sweat” a Pulitzer Prize- Winning Play That Lives Up to Its’ Title

Sweat 4“Sweat”is this year’s Pulitzer-Prize winning play. and it more than earns that great accolade, as well as its’ daring title. “Sweat” dares you to take into account the sweat of most of its’ main characters’ smaller-than-life lives. Sweat could be a synonym here for “work,” and that is what most of its’ squashed denizens of Reading, Pennsylvania do. Actually, it’s more like slavery. They are slaves to the Steel Mill that the entire town’s economy and their lives are attached to at the hip –Sweat 1 morning, noon and night, until they die. It’s brutal. It’s tough stuff. Now two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage is no stranger to horror. Witness her other, superb, previous Pulitzer-winner “Ruined” about the unspeakable terrors of African warfare and its’ ruinous effect on women.

“Sweat” tackles horrors you can speak of. Over-work and under-pay being the two main topics of nearly every conversation, its’ hard-scrabble characters carry on at the local bar, which is almost womb-like in its’ superb setting by John Lee Beatty, which is so familial and familiar, you feel like you’ve been hanging out there for years, as the plays bedraggled characters have.

If this bar, and its’ Christ-like bartender (a superb James Colby) seem right out of “The Iceman Cometh”, you’re not far wrong. Nottage is really plowing Eugene O’Neill’s lower depths, as well as her own. And like O’Neill, they are all being crushed and cursed by alcohol. Being that it’s 2017, other addictions apply, and pile up on “Sweat”s beleaguered characters as the actions to close down the Mill roll over all their lives in a relentless juggernaut of corporate greed and union busting that leads, of course, to catastrophe.

“Sweat” is terrifyingly prescient. This is the first play I’ve seen that explains why “You Know Who” to quote the View’s Whoopi Goldberg, got elected. This is a Rust-Belt play with all the Rust in full view.Sweat 2“Sweat” begins its’ road to hell-in-a-hand-basket with two matched monologues of two young men, barely out of their teens, childhood friends’ it turns out, one black, one white, who have been imprisoned there for some unspeakable, violent act. We don’t find out just what, until the frightening ending, but suffice it to say, that Khris and Jacob’s predicament hangs over the play like the doomed fog that has shrouded all these characters’ lives, white and black. Eugene O’Neill’s characters have gone from Pipe Dreams to Rust.Sweat 3The cast is uniformly excellent but I do have to single out the German descent White-Supremicist-in-the-making of Will Pullen, who has totally nailed the seemingly sweet, but really brutal Jason, a totally exact product of rural Pennsylvania and his factory working Mom, the Tony nominated Johanna Day.

The two of them enact a scene of horror that rivals any horror film, when he finally gets out of jail and comes home to borrow $5 from her only to find that she is now completely unemployed and a hopeless pill-head, Without that pollution-spilling Steel Mill, they’re both reduced to hopeless addicts and their lives and hopes destroyed.Sweat 5No, “Sweat” isn’t for the faint-of-heart, but it’s god-damned powerful. And Lynn Nottage’s capturing their pain and frustration so winningly is a compelling sign of hope.


#Lynn Nottage #Pulitzer Prize, #Sweat, #Broadway, #Will Pullen # Johanna Day, #Reading Pennsylvania # Stell MillsSweat 4

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